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Interview with Lee Aase

Maybe you read the post I recently wrote about a slideshow describing how Mayo Clinic utilizes social media in fantastic ways. This slideshow was created by Lee Aase (@LeeAase), who happens to be manager of Syndication and Social Media for Mayo Clinic (@mayoclinic). Mr. Aase, despite his busy schedule, was kind enough to answer some of my questions that might be of interest to you.

I.K. Please tell me a little bit more about your background and how you ended up manager of Syndication and Social Media for Mayo Clinic?

L.A. I started working in media relations for Mayo Clinic in April 2000, focusing on cardiology, but in 2003 became manager of our media relations team. We have produced syndicated news packages for local TV stations since 2000, and for local radio stations since 2004. In 2005 we converted the mp3 files from the radio program into a podcast series, which became quite popular. That paved the way for us to do longer podcasts, a Facebook fan page and blogs, and eventually hiring another manager for national media relations, while I focus on our syndicated products and the social media platforms.

I.K. What are your duties and responsibilities? Could you maybe describe your regular work day?

L.A. My main duties are to lead the team the produces our syndicated news content and produces tailored, extended content for social media platforms. Our role is not to “do” all the social media, but to be a catalyst to involve others. We provide training for public affairs staff so they can incorporate social media strategies into all of their communications projects, and so that they in turn can offer guidance to other employees. A major part of my job is “evangelism” for our Mayo Clinic social media platforms, both internally and externally.

I.K. I saw from your slideshow that Mayo Clinic utilizes podcasts, blogs, YouTube, Facebook and Twitter. Would you be so kind to bring closer to us the processes which occur in the background? Just from a practical perspective, how does this function? How many people are working on maintaining all of these services, how independent are they?

L.A. We have a small core team (about 3 people) who facilitate involvement from others in these platforms. For example, someone outside the team who covers the cardiology beat may interview one of our physicians about research coming in a journal, and will do that on a consumer-grade video camera. This will be part of a post on the News Blog, and the video will be used to help journalists better understand the story and to communicate directly with consumers and patients. Our core team does the video editing to ensure quality. In this way, social media isn’t another “silo” but is instead incorporated into all communications, involving our whole department.

I.K. Your latest creation is Sharing Mayo Clinic, a hub to integrate Mayo social media, where your patients, families, friends and employees can share their stories. How do your employees respond to such opportunities? Do you have some numbers, statistics regarding their involvement that you can share with us?

L.A. We have been pleased with the response to Sharing Mayo Clinic, as we have had more than 100 posts and over 600 comments. Traffic built steadily until last month, when one of the featured videos went “viral” and has been viewed more than 2.7 million times on YouTube. This was certainly unexpected but has accelerated growth of the blog, which only launched in late January of this year.

I.K. You are also the Chancellor of Social Media University, which is a post-secondary educational institution dedicated to providing practical, hands-on training in social media to lifelong learners. Sounds really interesting. How did you come up with the idea to start it? How are you happy with the response so far?

L.A. It started as my personal blog, which I used to get practical experience in blogging and social media so I could see how to apply the tools for Mayo. As I began doing presentations about my work, it soon became apparent there was a need — particularly for mid-career professionals — to learn about social media. So I reorganized my blog and re-branded it as SMUG (Social Media University, Global) as a fun, humorous way to learn serious work-related applications for social media tools. By creating a series of curricula covering the major platforms, it lets people work through and learn at their own pace in a logical order, such as Podcasting 101, 102, 103 etc. I’ve been thrilled with the response, with SMUGgles (as we call our student body) from every continent except Antarctica. It’s neat that through social media someone from a small city in Minnesota can interact with people from all over the world.

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How Mayo Clinic utilizes Web 2.0

Lee Aase (@LeeAase) is manager of Syndication and Social Media for Mayo Clinic. During Community 2.0 Conference which recently took place in San Francisco, he presented how Mayo Clinic has been taking advantage of Web 2.0 and social media. Take a look at his slide show to learn how Mayo Clinic fantastically promotes itself with basically no financial investments.

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iPod Touch to every medical student

ipod touch

I have been writing about benefits of using the iPhone and iPod Touch for quite some time. But of course I am not the only one who thinks that these devices are perfect for doctors and medical students.

The Ohio State University Medical Center has decided to provide each medical student a standard iPod touch, equipped with specific medical software programs planned by the OSU College of Medicine, over the next two years. I think their initiative is just great.

Here is their press release:

OSU USES HAND-HELD TECHNOLOGY TO STRENGTHEN PATIENT CARE

iPod TouchWith the use of portable media players, medical students at The Ohio State University Medical Center can now carry the equivalent of heavy textbooks and medical references in their lab coat pockets. The portable media players are part of the current technology making it easier for medical students at OSU to navigate classroom lectures and clinical duties with patients.

Justin Harper, a third-year medical student, saw the Apple iPod touch and helped launch a program for OSU medical students. The Ohio State University College of Medicine is the only college currently using the iPod touch to give to all its students for educational purposes.

“The iPod touch has the potential to positively impact both medical education and the care provided to patients at the bedside,” said Dr. Catherine Lucey, vice dean for education. “The personal digital assistant puts a wealth of information at the fingertips of our students. They can study when they want and where they want. If they are seeing a patient and a question arises, they can find the answer instantly, to share with them.”

This hand-held technology can provide graphics, which allow students to refer to resources such as high quality images of each organ and nerve in the body. They can review images from multiple angles, access videos of medical treatments or surgical procedures, and request a review quiz at any time. In addition, detailed photographs on portable media players can help patients identify their current medications and immediately obtain a list of all potential drug interactions.

Over the next two years, each Ohio State medical student will receive a standard iPod touch, equipped with specific medical software programs planned by the OSU College of Medicine.

According to Lucey, this effort continues OSU Medical Center’s leadership in the use of technology to improve the quality of education and patient care.

“We are committed to providing our students with the best tools available, to help them provide outstanding patient care,” said Lucey. “I am delighted that OSU Medical Center is on the cutting edge of a trend that will undoubtedly expand to medical schools across the country.”

The Ohio State University College of Medicine also provides podcasts of medical school lectures, making all lectures and medical school curricula available on line, for review at any time. Students have access to the most recently published research articles and the current medical literature.

Thank you Luka for the tip.
Source Cult of Mac.

Here are some of my earlier posts about the iPhone/ipod Touch:

Why is iPhone perfect for doctors
Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations on iPhone
CME application for iPhone

To read all of my posts related to the iPhone/ipod Touch access my iPhone category.

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Brush up your clinical skills with video podcasts

Podcasts can be a great educational tool. They are a free video or audio series, like a TV or radio show that you download and play, whenever you chose, on your computer, TV, iPod, iPhone or other portable media player. There are numerous podcast directories which can help you find interesting podcasts. One of the most popular and certainly the one which started it all is iTunes Store. Apart from offering music, TV shows, movies and iPhone/iPod applications for sale, it features thousands of different podcasts. Among them many are related to medicine, and some can even help you improve your clinical examination skills. To be able to watch these podcasts, you will need to have iTunes installed on your computer and preferably a broadband Internet connection. Some of the episodes can be quite big and take a long time to download on a slow connection.

Here is my selection of video podcasts from the iTunes store which can help you brush up your clinical skills.

Clinical Examinations
by Professor Karim Mearan
Imperial College London, Faculty of Medicine

Exam
This podcast currently has 5 episodes featuring a physician performing following examination:

  • Cardiology
  • Respiratory
  • Cranial nerves
  • Neurological – lower limbs
  • Neurological – upper limbs

Integrated Clinical Method
by ICM Team
Swansea University Medical School

exam
So far, there are in total 10 episodes with two physician demonstrating different exams:

  • Cardiovascular system
  • Respiratory system
  • Abdominal
  • Lumbar spine
  • Cervical spine
  • Ankle and foot
  • Knee
  • Hip
  • Elbow
  • Shoulder

Uva Clinical Skills Videos
by Office of Medical Education
University of Virginia

exam
In this series you will find clinical examination videos, but also videos depicting medical procedures and tips for taking patient’s history.

Clinical exams

  • Knee
  • Low back
  • Shoulder
  • Upper extremities
  • Lower extremities
  • Skin
  • Vital signs
  • Chest
  • HEENT
  • Cardiac
  • Abdominal
  • Neurologic
  • Ophtalmoscopic

Medical procedures

  • Central line placement
  • Intubation
  • Standard venipuncture
  • Butterfly venipuncture

History taking

  • Sexual history
  • Interview with sexual health issues

Neonatology
by Rijeka University School of Medicine
neonatology exam
While all of the above mentioned podcasts demonstrate clinical examination of adult patients, this one show you how to examine newborn babies. Until today, 11 videos are made available demonstrating clinical examination of primitive reflexes.

  • Introduction: Primitive Reflexes
  • Walking reflex
  • Tonic neck reflex
  • Sucking reflex
  • Rooting reflex
  • Pull to Sit
  • Moro Response
  • Magnet reflex
  • Grasp response
  • Galant’s reflex
  • Crawling reflex

You’re still here? Go on, hurry and download some of these excellent podcasts and become a better clinical examiner.

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Why is iPhone perfect for doctors

I purchased my iPhone about six months ago and it has in many ways changed my life for the better. This is especially true regarding my work as a medical doctor. I believe that iPhone is a perfect gadget and that it can improve any physician’s performance. That is way I decided to present some of many useful ways you can utilize iPhone in your practice.

Access your Electronic Medical Record

Life Record is a company which produces Life Record Electronic Medical Record (EMR) software. What is interesting about it is that you can access your records form an iPhone. You can also make updates and even write prescriptions.

View medical images

To view your radiology images remotely you can use the Mobile MIM iPhone Application. This application provides multi-planar reconstruction of data sets from modalities including CT, PET, MRI and SPECT, as well as multi-modality image fusion. Using the multi-touch interface, users can change image sets and planes; adjust zoom, fusion blending, and window/level.

Calculate, compute, add, subtract, multiply, divide

Medical Calculator gives quick access to calculations that are too hard to memorize or perform in your head. There are around 50 clinical calculations that you can do with it right now, and more are coming. To not get lost, favorite those you use often.

Medical calculator

Access drug information

Epocrates Rx software for iPhone puts continually updated peer-reviewed drug information at your fingertips. This can improve patient care and safety, save time, reduce administrative burden and enable confident clinical decisions.

Take notes

There are many powerful note taking apps for iPhone out there. But let me just present the two most interesting, Evernote and Jott.

Evernote allows you to take text, snapshot, saved photo and voice notes. When you take for example a voice note, you can add a title to it, some description and tags. The interesting thing happens after you have taken your notes. They synchronize with your online account and what this means is that you can access them from anywhere. From your computer using a desktop application or from any other computer in the World with an Internet connection via the web interface. Everything is always synchronized across all of your devices. One cool thing that Evernote can do is transcribe images, meaning that it is capable to find text inside an image and make it searchable. It doesn’t yet transcribe your voice notes to text, but I believe this feature will be coming in the near future.

There are some advices on how to use Evernote on The Efficient MD blog, but I am sure you can think of many more ways to utilize this app. For example you could take snapshots of your patient’s injuries in the ER or record interviews with your patients.

Well, this other application, Jott is capable of doing what Evernote still can’t. It can capture your to-dos and transcribe your voice into text and place the resulting notes in your lists.

If you like Evernote, but desperately need for your voice notes to be transcribed to text, don’t worry. There is this great hack from Lifehacker that can help you.

Stay on top of your field

As a modern evidence based medicine physician you have to read and follow new developments in your field. Often you find interesting articles on the Internet, but don’t have time to read them. My advice is to save them for latter and read them on your iPhone during your breaks, when you are on call and have some free time or while waiting in some line. Perfect little app that can help you do just that is Instapaper and it is one of my favorite iPhone app ever. When you find something on your computer that you want to read later, simply click Read latter bookmark. Then when you have time, just open Instapaper app on your iPhone and read those articles. You would think that the iPhone’s screen is too small to read, but you would be wrong. It’s high resolution screen and zoom capabilities make reading enjoyable.

Of course you can read whole books on the iPhone too. Use Stanza to transfer and read all your important medical e-books.

Apart from reading, you can do a little bit of watching and listening, to thousands of podcasts in the medicine category. A podcast is a series of audio or video digital-media files which is distributed over the Internet and can be transfered to your iPhone. Listen and watch podcast from The Lancet, The New England Journal of Medicine and many others while you, let say, travel to work.
Podcast directory

Enhance your scientific research

You can use your iPhone to find scientific literature. Download PubSearch and search among the millions of research papers indexed in PubMed. This app has a simple user interface with fast access to the PubMed database, and it lets you concentrate on finding the research articles you need without getting in your way. PubSearch Plus is on the way and it will allow you to not only read abstracts, but full-text articles too.

Convert your iPhone into a wireless external disk, one with a lot of memory. This way you can carry around all the important documents for your undergoing scientific project. Come to a meeting with your colleagues and have all your excel and powerpoint files with you. Also bring some scientific articles in pdf, or other format, related to your research. All these files can easily be opened on your iPhone or access from any PC or Mac in the room. This is all done using AirSharing for iPhone.

Play games

You too deserve to have fun from time to time. There are numerous great games for iPhone and if nothing these can help you relax during an intensive and difficult shift. There have been some results published about video games and their ability to enhance surgeons’ performance. So before your next surgery why not try playing a game like Labyrinth to get you all warmed up and focused.

As you can see there are numerous useful ways you can utilize iPhone as a medical professional. This is not all of course, there are many other interesting apps coming up everyday and I did not mention the obvious things like reading email, surfing the web and contacting people via sms or IM services. I am looking forward to new medical apps that might appear in the future. Also, wouldn’t it be cool if somebody introduced some iPhone medical accessories. I would like to see some pulse oximeter sensors or ECG cables for iPhone. They could plugin-in to it’s 30-pin dock connector to input data which, I am sure, due to it’s processing power iPhone would not have a problem to analyze. Are we getting closer to those great all in one medical devices from Star Trek? 🙂
Star Trek

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Neonatology vodcast

Couple of months ago my colleague Ileana Lulic, also a medical doctor from Croatia, and myself started to produce a vodcast in collaboration with Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at the University Hospital Rijeka. Vodcast is essentially a video podcast, online delivery of video on demand content via RSS feeds. Our vodcast was conceived with an idea to offer a quick review of the clinical examination of the newborn infant. Until today we have published 11 videos, in both Croatian and English, demonstrating the proper way to inspect primitive reflexes in the newborn infant, and 2 videos demonstrating procedures in neonatology (lumbar puncture and umbilical vein catheterization), currently only in Croatian.

You can view our videos here. To change between videos just change the slide at the left bottom.

Additionally you can visit our YouTube channel, our page at the iTunes store or subscribe to our RSS feed.

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