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Interpret acid-base results on your iPhone

During my medical school years and now when I myself practice medicine, I have noticed that a lot of people have trouble interpreting the arterial blood gases (ABG) test. This test normally provides partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2), pH and bicarbonate (HCO3) values. It is important and quite easy to notice if some of these figures are not normal, but interpretation is crucial and sometimes difficult. For these reasons I am sure a lot of practicing medical workers will be pleased to hear that there is now a great application for the iPhone which can be of big help during the interpretation of the ABG test.

The mentioned app is called Acid Plus and is available through the iTunes Store for only $1.99. Acid Plus is extremely easy to use. You open it, enter the ABG test values and the app interprets it for you. Take a look at some of the screen shots.

If you turn the iPhone to landscape view, you will see a colorful graph with an arrow pointing to the disorder.

Acid Plus will also provide you with common causes of the primary acid-base disorders.

Acid Plus rapidly found its way into my top most useful medical apps for the iPhone. If you are practicing medicine and own an iPhone, you need to have it.

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Four new iPhone medical apps

In two days, four new medical apps have appeared in the iTunes App store. You might want to check them out if you own an iPhone or iPod Touch.

1. The Human Body 2
Price: $2.99

This app will help you understand the basics of different systems:
1. The nervous system
2. Muscle System and parts
3. Some internal organs of the body
4. Skeletal System
5. And basics parts of the brain
Authors promise they will update the app every few months, but so far it doesn’t show much promise. For something much better in the same domain look at the Netter’s Anatomy Flash Cards.

2. Medcalc
Price: free

MedCalc is a free medical calculator, that gives you easy access to complicated medical formulas and scores. It has been available on mobile platforms for almost a decade, so it leverages years of experience in bringing medical equations to physicians in an easy to use, yet very powerful format.

3. Sedation
Price: $4.99

This app provides quick access to procedural sedation and analgesia information. Imaging if you just meet someone and they were browsing through you iPhone to see what apps you have, and they saw one called Sedation. Ups, this guys is up to no good, I am not going on any more blind dates, ever!

Sedation includes medications, reversal agents, major tranquilizers, preparation, pretreatment, and calculated drug doses for the patient’s actual weight. It also supports kg and lbs. Drug details include doses, pregnancy category, preparation, onset, duration, indications, contraindications, major side-effects, method of use, approximate pharmacy cost, and more.

4. ATP3 Lipids
Price: $4.99

This app features:

  • Patients’ specific cholesterol classifications and goals
  • Specific therapeutic recommendations from the ATP III based on cholesterol levels and risk factors
  • Details of cholesterol management drugs (dosing, percentage change, side effects, and contraindications)
  • Complete Framingham Cardiac Risk calculator, shown automatically when needed
  • Fast input via the MediMath interface
  • Complete ATP III Quick Desk Reference and full report available within ATP3 Lipids
  • Maintains information across program uses
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im bored colgate

Google updated their iPhone app to include voice recognition. You simply tap a button, speak up keywords you want to use to search the web, the software recognizes what you said and gives you back your search results.

When I tried pronouncing my name, Ivor Kovic, Google app recognized it as “im bored colgate”. This made me laugh hysterically and realize two thing, I need to improve my accent and Google needs to improve its software. On the other hand, the app works flawlessly most of the times and it offers the best voice recognition that I encountered so far on the iPhone.

Take a look at the video demonstration from Google.

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iPhone theme for my blog

I installed a specific blog theme only for iPhone/iPod Touch, so my blog is now more easier to read and navigate with these mobile devices. This is something worth doing considering the fact that iPhone is top mobile internet browser in the USA. Of course, people can access your blog using iPhone’s built in browser Safari but this customization really improves their experience.

Take a look at the difference.

iphone theme
iphone theme

If you want to get this feature for your blog and are using WordPress to run it, follow these simple instructions.

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CME application for iPhone

Company called ReachMD has released their Continuing Medical Education (CME) application for the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch. This app is just great for all you busy healthcare practitioners who want to learn something new and earn free CME credits. After you install it on your iPhone you have to register, choose the program you are interested in, listen to it, and take the test. Very simple and convenient.

Take a look at some screen shots.

ReachMDReachMDReachMDReachMDReachMD

Download ReachMD app for free.

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DIY navigation system for surgeons

Maki Sugimoto
Apple brings a story of professor Maki Sugimoto of Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center, a gastrointestinal surgeon, who wanted a better approach to navigation for planning and performing both aggressive and minimally invasive surgeries. He uses Apple computers with OsiriX imaging software to project 3D images onto a patient’s abdomen for both laparoscopic and midline open surgery.

Laparoscopic surgery

For patients with early-stage gastric or colonic cancer, the surgical team typically opts for minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery. With the patient anesthetized, Sugimoto projects OsiriX-generated 3D images onto the body surface of the patient with an Epson EMP-1715 projector. Using a motion-sensing wireless remote, Sugimoto uses physiological markers (such as the navel) to register the image to the patient’s body. Then using a Color Look Up Table (CLUT) feature in OsiriX, he makes the skin of the image transparent. The display now shows the patient’s internal body parts and the area that he will need to operate on.

Open surgery

“The 3D visualization shows us relationships between the cancer and the arterial vessels and other surrounding organs,” says Sugimoto. “It also allows us to see the extent of the spread of cancer. When a patient has upper biliary (bile duct) cancer, we have to cut the liver. If the patient has lower bile duct cancer we have to remove the pancreatic head and duodenum. The HBP system is very complex; that’s why 3D visualization in the OR is so crucial. When doing a midline open surgery, the surgeon can only see the organs from the top. With OsiriX on the Mac, surgeons can rotate and see the surrounding organs in 3D to guide them during surgery.

Visit Apple to learn more and see more pictures and videos.

Image credits – Apple Inc.

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