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Informed Pocket Guides for the iPhone

Informed Pocket Guide
I discovered Informed Pocket Guides almost two years ago and have been a huge fan ever since. The first product I got was the Emergency & Critical Care Pocket Guide. I believe the fact that I take extra care this little/big guide is always in my bag when I go to work, says it all. It is small, light and compact, yet it has all the necessary reference information you might need in medical emergencies. It is especially useful if you work in the field.
Informed Pocket Guide pages
Emergency & Critical Care Pocket Guide has almost 200 pages and covers the following topics:

  • Current ACLS Algorithms, Lab Values, Metrics, Notes
  • Emergency, ACLS Drugs & Top Prescription Drugs
  • IV Drips, Drug Infusions, Dosages
  • Poisons & Overdose / ‘Rave’ Drug
  • 12-Lead ECG Section & Acute MI
  • Medical Emergencies Section
  • Quick EMS Spanish Translations
  • Fibrinolytics for AMI & Stroke / CVA
  • Childbirth, Diabetic, Respiratory Distress
  • Pediatric Resuscitation, Drug Doses, Vitals
  • Trauma, Triage, MCI, Glasgow Coma Scales
  • Airway Management /RSI
  • Burn Charts, the ‘Rule of 9s’
  • Pulse Oximetry
  • Infectious Diseases

Well, ever since the first iPhone medical apps started appearing, I thought to myself… hmmm I would love to have my medical pocket guides on this great device. Obviously, it was just a matter of time when Informed would port them to this mobile platform, and yes they are here! The complete series of Informed Medical Pocket Guides are now available for the iPhone and iPod touch. Titles like the RN Pocket Guide™, EMS Field Guide® BLS & ALS edition, NIMS: Incident Command System Field Guide™, and of course the Emergency & Critical Care Pocket Guide™ are available for $9,99 USD via the iTunes store. In fact the Emergency & Critical Care Pocket Guide app has just recently been updated with many improvements, so now is the best time to present it to you.

Informed Pocket Guide and app
If we take a look at the content, the app is the same as the pocket guide. The basic difference is that on one side you have a physical pocket guide, and on the other an application for your iPhone. Now, bringing the guide to the iPhone has some advantages and some disadvantages. First of all, you no longer have to worry about forgetting the pocket guide. You have all the same information available on your mobile phone, which you carry everyday and everywhere you go. This all makes perfect sense, since the iPhone is by itself a great mobile phone for doctors and other medical workers. So having another great medical app running on it just makes it even more powerful. Furthermore, you can do things with the app which are impossible or difficult to do with the pocket guide. One such thing, and maybe the most important one, is finding information quickly. The pocket guide is not an encyclopedia, but still it has a lot of dense information on small pages, so finding exactly what you need can prove to be difficult. Sometimes I just know that I have seen a piece of information or a chart in the guide, but cannot find it unless I flip thru numerous pages. The app is the champion in this area. It is very easy to find information you need thanks to the great built in search function, but also other navigation features like the possibility to flick thru pages, go to a specific page, browse the table of contents and see thumbnails of pages. Other interesting features include bookmarks and notes which again are there to make the data you need and often use more accessible. On the down side, the iPhone screen is a little bit smaller that the pages of the pocket guide. Maybe this could be a problem for some, even though the resolution is high so you can simply zoom in and see all the details. Also, you might not like the idea of bringing your iPhone with you in the field out of the fear it might get damaged or other reasons. I also found that sometimes its touch screen does not work flawlessly if I wear protective gloves.

Here are some of the photos of the Emergency & Critical Care app and the pocket guide:

Both the pocket guide and the app have things going for them, so you will have to choose which one better suites your work flow and style. I like them both so much and cannot decide. It seams that the pocket guide will remain in my bag and the app on my iPhone. I am really looking forward to new updates of the app, and hope that in the future it will incorporate more interactive content, so it could maybe replace some of the other apps I have installed on my iPhone, like various medical calculators.

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Clinical Trials app: video review and giveaway

Recently Kat Sanders presented Clinical Trials app for iPhone in a guest post on my blog. Now I am bringing you a video review of this great app.

But that’s not all! Geoffrey Young of StopWatch Media, makers of Clinical Trials app, was kind enough to offer us 4 promo codes which you can use to download and install this app for free on your iPhone. We will be giving away these codes to 4 fastest readers. Let me just remind you that this app is worth $25.

UPDATE!!! Giveaway is over. Congratulations Richard, Matija, Martin and Peter!

Here is what you have to do:

  • Watch the video review
  • Write down in which minute of the video I talk about “Top Studies via Clinical Trials.app”
  • Send me an e-mail with your full name and correct answer
  • If you are fast enough, you will receive one promo code and instructions how to download Clinical Trials app for free!

Good Luck!

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iBreath Alcohol Breathalyzer

iBreath Alcohol Breathalyzer is an iPod and iPhone accessory that lets you take your own alcohol breath test before deciding to drive. Anything that could stop even one drunk driver is fine by me. I am amazed by all these iPod accessories people are creating. Take a look at the promotional video.

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Four new iPhone medical apps

In two days, four new medical apps have appeared in the iTunes App store. You might want to check them out if you own an iPhone or iPod Touch.

1. The Human Body 2
Price: $2.99

This app will help you understand the basics of different systems:
1. The nervous system
2. Muscle System and parts
3. Some internal organs of the body
4. Skeletal System
5. And basics parts of the brain
Authors promise they will update the app every few months, but so far it doesn’t show much promise. For something much better in the same domain look at the Netter’s Anatomy Flash Cards.

2. Medcalc
Price: free

MedCalc is a free medical calculator, that gives you easy access to complicated medical formulas and scores. It has been available on mobile platforms for almost a decade, so it leverages years of experience in bringing medical equations to physicians in an easy to use, yet very powerful format.

3. Sedation
Price: $4.99

This app provides quick access to procedural sedation and analgesia information. Imaging if you just meet someone and they were browsing through you iPhone to see what apps you have, and they saw one called Sedation. Ups, this guys is up to no good, I am not going on any more blind dates, ever!

Sedation includes medications, reversal agents, major tranquilizers, preparation, pretreatment, and calculated drug doses for the patient’s actual weight. It also supports kg and lbs. Drug details include doses, pregnancy category, preparation, onset, duration, indications, contraindications, major side-effects, method of use, approximate pharmacy cost, and more.

4. ATP3 Lipids
Price: $4.99

This app features:

  • Patients’ specific cholesterol classifications and goals
  • Specific therapeutic recommendations from the ATP III based on cholesterol levels and risk factors
  • Details of cholesterol management drugs (dosing, percentage change, side effects, and contraindications)
  • Complete Framingham Cardiac Risk calculator, shown automatically when needed
  • Fast input via the MediMath interface
  • Complete ATP III Quick Desk Reference and full report available within ATP3 Lipids
  • Maintains information across program uses
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A.D.A.M. Symptom Navigator for iPhone

Recently I wrote about native medical applications soon to be available for iPhone. Until you wait for them to come out, why not try some already available medical web applications for iPhone.

A.D.A.M. Symptoms Navigator is one such application.

With this tool, you can easily find out what to do about any symptoms — wherever you are! Learn self care, when to go to the doctor, and when it is an emergency. Whether you are traveling on vacation with your family, or on a business trip and feeling ill, an extensive library of symptom guidance is at your fingers – all within just a couple of taps.

Take a look at the video demonstration I made.

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Native medical applications for iPhone

Apple Worldwide Developers Conference is taking place this week in San Francisco. Today, as a part of it, we saw yet another legendary keynote from Steve Jobs. It was all about the new iPhone, which is now faster, richer with new features and more affordable. Substantial part of the keynote was dedicated to the developers of native applications for iPhone, who had the chance to demonstrate their applications soon to be available through the iPhone app store. App store is launching in a month and will enable you to download and install third party applications to your iPhone. These are some great news for all iPhone users, but especially to those interested in medicine. It seams that we have a lot to look for, as some great applications will be awaiting for us as soon as the app store opens.

Two applications presented at today’s keynote were related to medicine, and you can see a video of these demonstrations at the end of this post.

Modality will offer interactive flash cards for medical students, but also a lot more. On their website they also prepared a lot of other interactive learning applications for medical students, as well as healthcare professionals. What a great way to learn!

MIMvista has, on the other hand, presented a really powerful radiology application. It is incredible that such an application can run so smoothly on a phone. Currently there are no additional information on their website about this iPhone application, but you can learn more about their applications for PC’s to give you a general idea what to expect.

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