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20 emergency physicians with most followers on Twitter

I have been systematically following emergency physicians on Twitter for more than 3 years now thru my TwittER project. It all started in 2012 when I analysed around 600 Twitter account by emergency physicians. This report has been published in EMJ – Analysis of emergency physicians’ Twitter accounts.

Since 2012 I have added many more emergency physicians to the list, and I am currently following almost 1500. I believe this to be the biggest curated list of emergency physicians on Planet Earth.

Here are the top 20 emergency physicians with most followers on Twitter and some stats about their accounts. Tables and graphs are interactive. For example your can sort data in tables by clicking on header descriptions.
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Ultrasound guided peripheral venous access video lecture

My dear readers, if you even exist anymore :-), I have neglected you. For that I am sorry. My last post was more than a year ago. A year in which I maybe some big changes in my life and career. I have moved to the United Kingdom and currently have a new, cool and shiny job. My time is divided between emergency department and medical simulation suite. So I get to do all the things I love, seeing patients, teaching others, playing with high fidelity manikins and conducting small and sweet IT projects.

During the last year or so, I have gone nuts for point of care ultrasound (POCUS). When I am in the emergency department use of ultrasound jumps by 300%. I use it very often and can say that in many ways it has revolutionised my practice. So I wanted to share my knowledge and excitement of its use. I started creating video lectures, as well as combined e-learning courses at my hospital, of all the ways ultrasound can help you make a difference for your patients.

So, insert drum roll here, here it is! My first video lecture demonstrating how to use ultrasound to gain peripheral venous access. Hope you’ll like it, because there are others following soon, and I intend to bore you with them as well 😉

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