Skip to content

You are viewing the emergency medicine tag archive.

20 emergency physicians with most followers on Twitter

I have been systematically following emergency physicians on Twitter for more than 3 years now thru my TwittER project. It all started in 2012 when I analysed around 600 Twitter account by emergency physicians. This report has been published in EMJ – Analysis of emergency physicians’ Twitter accounts.

Since 2012 I have added many more emergency physicians to the list, and I am currently following almost 1500. I believe this to be the biggest curated list of emergency physicians on Planet Earth.

Here are the top 20 emergency physicians with most followers on Twitter and some stats about their accounts. Tables and graphs are interactive. For example your can sort data in tables by clicking on header descriptions.
Continue reading 20 emergency physicians with most followers on Twitter

27 Comments

CPR PRO® Device Reduces Rescuer Fatigue during CPR

CPR PRO
We have just published an article in The Journal of Emergency Medicine titled “CPR PRO® Device Reduces Rescuer Fatigue during Continuous Chest Compression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Crossover Trial Using a Manikin Model”

This is the first trial to test the benefits of the device I have invented and have been developing the last couple of years. This device is called CPR PRO and is intended to allow rescuers to performed better chest compressions.

Here is the summary of the article:

1. Why is this topic important?
Rescuers are often required to perform cardiopulmo- nary resuscitation (CPR) for prolonged periods of time, and their fatigue has been shown to cause significant decline in quality of chest compressions, which are crucial for survival of sudden cardiac arrest victims.

2. What does this study attempt to show?
In our randomized crossover trial, health care professionals performed continuous chest compression CPR for 10 min on a manikin to evaluate the impact of a novel CPR PRO! device for manual chest compression on res- cuer fatigue, pain, and CPR quality.

3. What are the key findings?
After using the CPR PRO device, subjects reported less pain in the hands and lower perceived exertion levels, as well as achieving lower average and maximal heart rates during testing, when compared to standard manual CPR. Reduced fatigue and pain has resulted in higher average depth of chest compressions, which declined more slowly over time, than with standard manual CPR.

4. How is patient care impacted?
In a simulated setting, a novel CPR PRO device for manual chest compression has been shown to reduce the work of CPR, which allowed rescuers to achieve signifi- cantly higher quality of chest compressions. Delivering higher quality of chest compressions with minimal interruptions in the clinical setting has a potential to result in better patient outcomes after sudden cardiac arrest.

1 Comment