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Directory of Emergency Physicians on Twitter

twitter researcher
I just launched a new mini website called TwittER ReaserchER. It is essentially a directory of emergency physicians across the globe who are using Twitter. The project started during research for an article about use of Twitter among emergency physicians. I started tweeting in 2008, and at that time there were only but a few emergency docs out there, but now we managed to identify almost 700 of them. The results of the analysis we performed on their accounts are currently under review in Emergency Medicine Journal. Hopefully the article will be accepted and published soon, so I can share the results with you.

On the website you can find a list of all the emergency physicians we were able to find using Twitter. Each user is represented by his/hers profile picture. If you click on it, you will be taken to the user’s Twitter profile. The list is constantly updating, and if you are an emergency physician using Twitter or know someone who is, please follow @research_er to get included. On this account we also created lists organizing emergency physicians according to the year they started tweeting. You can easily subscribe to these lists.

On the site you can also see the timeline of tweets from all the emergency physicians. It is updating every hour, so you can use it to follow what emergency physicians are saying on Twitter. This way you can follow them, without even being a registered Twitter user, which you should be!

Hope you like the site. I will try to improve it and add more features soon. Of course, your ideas are always welcomed.

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Haiti still needs help


Help Haiti by supporting the International Medical Corps (IMC), a global, humanitarian, nonprofit organization, founded by volunteer doctors and nurses and dedicated to saving lives and relieving suffering.

There are still thousands of patients seeking treatment of which approximately 80% are in need of surgery and are running out of time – especially with the tremendous aftershocks still devastating this country. The IMC team is treating crush injuries, trauma, substantial wound care, shock and other critical cases with the few available supplies – And they’re in it for the long haul.

You can help by donating funds, volunteering in Haiti, or just spreading the word (put the above widget on your site). With this organization you can be sure your money is going to the ones that need it. IMC is highly efficient, with more than 92% resources going directly to program activities.

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Informed Pocket Guides for the iPhone

Informed Pocket Guide
I discovered Informed Pocket Guides almost two years ago and have been a huge fan ever since. The first product I got was the Emergency & Critical Care Pocket Guide. I believe the fact that I take extra care this little/big guide is always in my bag when I go to work, says it all. It is small, light and compact, yet it has all the necessary reference information you might need in medical emergencies. It is especially useful if you work in the field.
Informed Pocket Guide pages
Emergency & Critical Care Pocket Guide has almost 200 pages and covers the following topics:

  • Current ACLS Algorithms, Lab Values, Metrics, Notes
  • Emergency, ACLS Drugs & Top Prescription Drugs
  • IV Drips, Drug Infusions, Dosages
  • Poisons & Overdose / ‘Rave’ Drug
  • 12-Lead ECG Section & Acute MI
  • Medical Emergencies Section
  • Quick EMS Spanish Translations
  • Fibrinolytics for AMI & Stroke / CVA
  • Childbirth, Diabetic, Respiratory Distress
  • Pediatric Resuscitation, Drug Doses, Vitals
  • Trauma, Triage, MCI, Glasgow Coma Scales
  • Airway Management /RSI
  • Burn Charts, the ‘Rule of 9s’
  • Pulse Oximetry
  • Infectious Diseases

Well, ever since the first iPhone medical apps started appearing, I thought to myself… hmmm I would love to have my medical pocket guides on this great device. Obviously, it was just a matter of time when Informed would port them to this mobile platform, and yes they are here! The complete series of Informed Medical Pocket Guides are now available for the iPhone and iPod touch. Titles like the RN Pocket Guide™, EMS Field Guide® BLS & ALS edition, NIMS: Incident Command System Field Guide™, and of course the Emergency & Critical Care Pocket Guide™ are available for $9,99 USD via the iTunes store. In fact the Emergency & Critical Care Pocket Guide app has just recently been updated with many improvements, so now is the best time to present it to you.

Informed Pocket Guide and app
If we take a look at the content, the app is the same as the pocket guide. The basic difference is that on one side you have a physical pocket guide, and on the other an application for your iPhone. Now, bringing the guide to the iPhone has some advantages and some disadvantages. First of all, you no longer have to worry about forgetting the pocket guide. You have all the same information available on your mobile phone, which you carry everyday and everywhere you go. This all makes perfect sense, since the iPhone is by itself a great mobile phone for doctors and other medical workers. So having another great medical app running on it just makes it even more powerful. Furthermore, you can do things with the app which are impossible or difficult to do with the pocket guide. One such thing, and maybe the most important one, is finding information quickly. The pocket guide is not an encyclopedia, but still it has a lot of dense information on small pages, so finding exactly what you need can prove to be difficult. Sometimes I just know that I have seen a piece of information or a chart in the guide, but cannot find it unless I flip thru numerous pages. The app is the champion in this area. It is very easy to find information you need thanks to the great built in search function, but also other navigation features like the possibility to flick thru pages, go to a specific page, browse the table of contents and see thumbnails of pages. Other interesting features include bookmarks and notes which again are there to make the data you need and often use more accessible. On the down side, the iPhone screen is a little bit smaller that the pages of the pocket guide. Maybe this could be a problem for some, even though the resolution is high so you can simply zoom in and see all the details. Also, you might not like the idea of bringing your iPhone with you in the field out of the fear it might get damaged or other reasons. I also found that sometimes its touch screen does not work flawlessly if I wear protective gloves.

Here are some of the photos of the Emergency & Critical Care app and the pocket guide:

Both the pocket guide and the app have things going for them, so you will have to choose which one better suites your work flow and style. I like them both so much and cannot decide. It seams that the pocket guide will remain in my bag and the app on my iPhone. I am really looking forward to new updates of the app, and hope that in the future it will incorporate more interactive content, so it could maybe replace some of the other apps I have installed on my iPhone, like various medical calculators.

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Clinical Trials app: video review and giveaway

Recently Kat Sanders presented Clinical Trials app for iPhone in a guest post on my blog. Now I am bringing you a video review of this great app.

But that’s not all! Geoffrey Young of StopWatch Media, makers of Clinical Trials app, was kind enough to offer us 4 promo codes which you can use to download and install this app for free on your iPhone. We will be giving away these codes to 4 fastest readers. Let me just remind you that this app is worth $25.

UPDATE!!! Giveaway is over. Congratulations Richard, Matija, Martin and Peter!

Here is what you have to do:

  • Watch the video review
  • Write down in which minute of the video I talk about “Top Studies via Clinical Trials.app”
  • Send me an e-mail with your full name and correct answer
  • If you are fast enough, you will receive one promo code and instructions how to download Clinical Trials app for free!

Good Luck!

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Health Blogs Observatory

Health Blogs Observatory
You should know by now that every time my posts are slower, I am creating something in the dark corner of my room :-). This was the case when I introduced the OpenECGproject, and it is the case now, when I am introducing the Health Blogs Observatory.

Health Blogs Observatory is an online research lab devoted to examination of the health blogosphere. It was created by the health bloggers and for the health bloggers.

Main goals of the project are:

Two major characteristics of the Health Blogs Observatory are collaboration and openness. This is why I would like to invite all health/medical bloggers to join the community and start contributing to it by adding their blogs to the web directory and participating in the design of the health bloggers survey.

To always stay informed about new developments at the Health Blogs Observatory, subscribe to our RSS feeds and follow us on Twitter.

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