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Hello World, again!

I started my own personal website and blog in 2008. It seams like ancient history now, and in Internet time it definitely is. I haven’t made any significant changes to it since then, but have decided to finally do them now.

Not much has changed with my new design. It is still very simple, both in terms of design and structure. However the subtle changes will make for a nicer reading experience on desktop and mobile allowing more readers to discover and share my posts.

I hope you will enjoy it.

Make sure you subscribe to my posts and contact me with your comments and suggestions.

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Webicina smartphone app

Webicina app
My dear colleague dr. Bertalan Mesko, better known as Berci, who just happens to be one of the best medical bloggers out there, has recently published his own smartphone app. You see, apart from running a super successful blog called ScienceRoll, Berci is the founder and managing director of Webicina, a site that has been helping physicians enter the web 2.0 era and empowering patients to find medically reliable content online. Webicina curates online medical resources in social media for free in over 15 languages in over 80 medical specialties and conditions, and is now also available on the phone near you. Webicina mobile application makes it easier to access these selected resources on smartphones and also includes a Health 2.0 Quiz which was designed to help empowered patients and medical professionals know more about the world of medicine and social media.

I have been testing the app on my iPhone, however it will soon also be available for other mobile platforms as well. For now you can download it for free in the iTunes store. The app is very nicely designed, and the cool thing is that you can browse through all the listed resources inside the app, without the need to go back and forward between your web browser. In just a few minutes of playing around with it, I found some great new resources and reminded myself of all the great content inside the Emergency Medicine category in which this blog is also featured. I can already see that I will be spending many hours exploring valuable new content on my phone using Webicina app, and if you want to stay on top of your game in your field, I strongly suggest you do the same.

Thank you Berci for providing such a wonderful, easy to use and free application for medical professionals and patients!

Learn more about Webicina.

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Interview with Lee Aase

Maybe you read the post I recently wrote about a slideshow describing how Mayo Clinic utilizes social media in fantastic ways. This slideshow was created by Lee Aase (@LeeAase), who happens to be manager of Syndication and Social Media for Mayo Clinic (@mayoclinic). Mr. Aase, despite his busy schedule, was kind enough to answer some of my questions that might be of interest to you.

I.K. Please tell me a little bit more about your background and how you ended up manager of Syndication and Social Media for Mayo Clinic?

L.A. I started working in media relations for Mayo Clinic in April 2000, focusing on cardiology, but in 2003 became manager of our media relations team. We have produced syndicated news packages for local TV stations since 2000, and for local radio stations since 2004. In 2005 we converted the mp3 files from the radio program into a podcast series, which became quite popular. That paved the way for us to do longer podcasts, a Facebook fan page and blogs, and eventually hiring another manager for national media relations, while I focus on our syndicated products and the social media platforms.

I.K. What are your duties and responsibilities? Could you maybe describe your regular work day?

L.A. My main duties are to lead the team the produces our syndicated news content and produces tailored, extended content for social media platforms. Our role is not to “do” all the social media, but to be a catalyst to involve others. We provide training for public affairs staff so they can incorporate social media strategies into all of their communications projects, and so that they in turn can offer guidance to other employees. A major part of my job is “evangelism” for our Mayo Clinic social media platforms, both internally and externally.

I.K. I saw from your slideshow that Mayo Clinic utilizes podcasts, blogs, YouTube, Facebook and Twitter. Would you be so kind to bring closer to us the processes which occur in the background? Just from a practical perspective, how does this function? How many people are working on maintaining all of these services, how independent are they?

L.A. We have a small core team (about 3 people) who facilitate involvement from others in these platforms. For example, someone outside the team who covers the cardiology beat may interview one of our physicians about research coming in a journal, and will do that on a consumer-grade video camera. This will be part of a post on the News Blog, and the video will be used to help journalists better understand the story and to communicate directly with consumers and patients. Our core team does the video editing to ensure quality. In this way, social media isn’t another “silo” but is instead incorporated into all communications, involving our whole department.

I.K. Your latest creation is Sharing Mayo Clinic, a hub to integrate Mayo social media, where your patients, families, friends and employees can share their stories. How do your employees respond to such opportunities? Do you have some numbers, statistics regarding their involvement that you can share with us?

L.A. We have been pleased with the response to Sharing Mayo Clinic, as we have had more than 100 posts and over 600 comments. Traffic built steadily until last month, when one of the featured videos went “viral” and has been viewed more than 2.7 million times on YouTube. This was certainly unexpected but has accelerated growth of the blog, which only launched in late January of this year.

I.K. You are also the Chancellor of Social Media University, which is a post-secondary educational institution dedicated to providing practical, hands-on training in social media to lifelong learners. Sounds really interesting. How did you come up with the idea to start it? How are you happy with the response so far?

L.A. It started as my personal blog, which I used to get practical experience in blogging and social media so I could see how to apply the tools for Mayo. As I began doing presentations about my work, it soon became apparent there was a need — particularly for mid-career professionals — to learn about social media. So I reorganized my blog and re-branded it as SMUG (Social Media University, Global) as a fun, humorous way to learn serious work-related applications for social media tools. By creating a series of curricula covering the major platforms, it lets people work through and learn at their own pace in a logical order, such as Podcasting 101, 102, 103 etc. I’ve been thrilled with the response, with SMUGgles (as we call our student body) from every continent except Antarctica. It’s neat that through social media someone from a small city in Minnesota can interact with people from all over the world.

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Wasting your life online

Are we all spending too much time on the Internet? It seams that a lot of people I know, the people whose blogs I am reading, the people who I follow on Twitter, are actually some kind of electrical beings living inside the biggest web of all. They are constantly online. Seriously, when they are not behind their computers, they are using their mobile phones just to always stay connected. Is this too much. Is there a limit. I mean, the next time I design some sort of a web survey, I am not going to ask how much hours a day you spend online, but rather how much hours a day you spend living in the real world. And sure, I confess, I am no much different.

Ahhh just forget about it, this great Joy of Tech cartoon got me thinking. Don’t worry, I’ll be myself again once I check my Twitter, and MyBlogLog, and Facebook, and LinkedIn, and Delicious, and my RSS reader, and Gmail, and …..

Joy of Tech

By the way, you can read the interview with the artist behind the Joy of Tech at the Croatian blog for Macintosh users I actually write for. Just scroll down, the English version is there somewhere.

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Promote the openECGproject

You visited the openECGproject, and you think the idea behind it is honorable. Well then, why not promote it. We designed some pretty good looking badges you could add to your web site. Simply copy and paste the code of the badge you want into your web page, forum or e-mail signature.

I love openECGproject

<a href="http://ivor-kovic.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/oep_badge1.png"><img title="I love openECGproject" src="http://ivor-kovic.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/oep_badge1.png" alt="I love openECGproject" width="147" height="18" /></a>

openECGproject

<a href="http://ivor-kovic.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/oep_badge2.png"><img title="openECGproject" src="http://ivor-kovic.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/oep_badge2.png" alt="openECGproject" width="122" height="125" /></a>

openECGproject

<a href="http://ivor-kovic.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/oep_badge3.png"><img title="openECGproject" src="http://ivor-kovic.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/oep_badge3.png" alt="openECGproject" width="131" height="147" /></a>

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Medicine 2.0 Blog Carnival Edition #33

Medicine 2.0 blog carnival
Welcome to the 33rd edition of Medicine 2.0 blog carnival that focuses on the integration of web 2.0 with our current practice of medicine. I am delighted to be your host this time around and would like to thank Berci Mesko for this opportunity.

I love numbers and 33 is a very beautiful number with many meanings. For this occasion I decided to play around with Medicine 2.0 blog carnival logo, so my dear iMac computer used numbers and complex calculations to transformed it. I took snapshots of specific segments from all of the blogs participating in this edition of Medicine 2.0 blog carnival and from these images a new mosaic image resembling the carnival’s logo has been assembled.

Thanks to the submissions from various bloggers, we have some pretty interesting articles for you. Lets begin immediately, cause I know you are curious.

Interviews

Amy Tenderich, author of DiabetesMine, wanted to know, among other things, if mainstream commercial health platforms from companies like Google and Microsoft are really useful for people with specific chronic illnesses? She conducted two interviews to satisfy her curiosity. First she interviewed Missy Krasner, Product Marketing Manager for Google Health, and later she did the same with Keith Toussaint, Senior Program Manager with Microsoft HealthVault.

People from SugarStats talked with Jennifer McCabe Gorman, one of Health 2.0’s most ‘visible’ online evangelist as they called her. By the way Jennifer wants you to know that her blog, Health Management Rx, is not dead. The reason her posts have been slow is because she is intensively preparing for Health 2.0: User-Generated Healthcare conference, which will be held in San Francisco, California from October 22nd – 23rd 2008.

I have on the other hand conducted an interview with Dr. R.A. Brest van Kempen. This gentleman happens to be the CEO of RS TechMedic, a Dutch company producing medical devices. In the interview he has announced the development of software which will enable physicians to monitor their patients in real time using only an iPhone.

Personal Health Records

Canadian EMR draws our attention to an article published in the Globe and Mail which highlights clinical information that will soon be available to patients in Alberta.

John Sharp, publisher of eHealth blog, has informed us that Google Health has added some web accessibility features to support text readers and enable access to the blind.

Bob Coffield, a health care lawyer and blogger has posted a very interesting article on his Health Care Law Blog. Title of this article, which he co-authored with Jud DeLoss, is “The Rise of the Personal Health Record: Panacea or Pitfall for Health Information” and it has been originally published in the October edition of the Health Lawyers News, a publication of the American Health Lawyers Association (AHLA). Be sure to read it if you want to learn more about legal issues around PHRs.

Social media

Ves Dimov of Clinical Cases and Images Blog shows us the beautiful flower of Internet conversation and dares us to count how many petals we have.

Kevin Pho, better known as Kevin M.D., found an article in Newsweek that talks about the potential of Web 2.0 applications in patient-physician communication.

Digital Pathology Blog asks and tries to answer the following question: Is image sharing “social networking” that should be blocked?

Scott Shreeve writes about his relationship with Twitter in Aint that Tweet?

Berci Mesko thinks you might like and find useful the Twitter directory called Just Tweet It.

Gunther Eysenbach, Editor-in-Chief and publisher of the Journal of Medical Internet Research, presents the research paper “Examining the Medical Blogosphere: An Online Survey of Medical Bloggers” and reflectes on the presentation of Kevin Clauson at the Medicine 2.0 congress in Toronto.

New websites

Medgadgdet informs about Pediatric Care Online, designed around the daily clinical needs of pediatric offices.

Joshua Schwimmer tells us about the new nephrology blog named Precious Bodily Fluids.

Change for the better

Dave deBronkart of e-patinets.net admires extraordinary bravery and integrity of the people from Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center who performed a procedure on the wrong body part and openly shared what happened on their blog.

Medical Education Blog presents a new approach to thinking about how we teach medical students called Application Oriented Curriculum.

There you have it. You read some interesting articles and during the process have boosted your brains, according to new research suggesting that the simple act of Googling may be good for your brain health.

For the end, I would like you to just think about two things. Submitting your articles to one of the future Medicine 2.0 blog carnivals or even hosting one yourself. Everything you need to know can be found on Medicine 2.0 blog carnival.

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