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Has Amazon figured out how to deliver AEDs?

Recently I wrote about the necessity to have AEDs (automated external defibrillators) everywhere, if we were to save more cardiac arrest victims. I argued that these devices need to be, and in my view can be, much cheaper than they’re now. I mean just look at this new Raspberry Pi Zero computer that costs only 5 USD!

Another approach is to deliver AEDs quickly to the scene of cardiac arrest. It has been proposed to deliver them by air via drones. There are currently many obstacles to this approach, including aircraft, airspace and cardiac arrest factors. Well, Amazon has, for all the different reasons, been very aggressively tackling the aircraft factors. Amazon sells goods and delivers them. And they are no longer satisfied, because we the costumers are not satisfied, to deliver them the next day. They/we want them delivered in a matter of hours. Their solution are again drones and their new delivery service called Amazon Prime Air. Amazon has been well aware of the shortcomings of existing drones, and since they surely have money to invest + vision and drive, they have been working on their own drones. Their new drone is fully autonomous, can fly for 15 miles at speeds up to 60 mph, and what is a great breakthrough, can fly vertically like octocopter and horizontally like a plane.

Rapid advances in the retail business might ultimately benefit other fields, including saving lives of cardiac arrest victims. Check out Amazon’s entertaining video about their new drone presented by Jeremy Clarkson.

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We need: cheap as chips AEDs

I am starting a new series of blog posts that I’ll call – We need. This is where I will be musing about things the World in a broad sense needs to be a better place. I will not be writing science fiction, but aim to write about what we can achieve soon, with the technology we already have, if we were just a bit more creative and bold.

My first article is about saving human lives with cheap Automated External Defibrillators.
Cheap as chips AED
Continue reading We need: cheap as chips AEDs

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Taking 100.000 lives per year in the UK

Do you know who is the infamous killer from the title?
AIDS? No
Lung cancer? No
Breast cancer? No
All of them combined? No, its sudden cardiac arrest.

Watch a short documentary about the massive loss of life in the UK due to sudden cardiac arrest and ways that the death rate can be dramatically reduced.

Help the goal to place 500 public access AEDs across the UK.

Learn and perform better quality CPR with our CPR PRO mobile app.
Learn how AEDs work and practice using these lifesaving machines with our AED Trainer app.

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Podcast: Bringing CPR into schools

A week ago, Resuscitation Council UK, together with the British Heart Foundation and the famous football player Fabrice Muamba, presented a 100,000-signature petition to Downing Street in order to make CPR mandatory part of school curriculum in the United Kingdom.

European Resuscitation Council spoke with Dr. Andrew Lockey, representative of Resuscitation Council, about their efforts to increase survival rates of sudden cardiac arrest in the UK by educating thousands of school children.

To find out how you can help, visit the BHF website.
Read one of my older posts, to learn what happened to Fabrice Muamba.

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My iPad app: AED Trainer

This post was originally published on Tue, 02/28/2012. However, due to issues with web hosting it has been temporarily removed.

A new iOS app I have been working on with my partners for quite some time, has finally been released today in the iTunes store. This iPad specific app is called AED Trainer and can be purchased on sale for 5.99 USD for a limited time period.

AED Trainer app transforms the iPad into a life-like simulator of automatic external defibrillator (AED), allowing the users to get familiar with these life-saving devices. For those who don’t know, AEDs are electronic devices used to deliver electrical shocks to people suffering from cardiac arrest. Electrical shock, also called defibrillation, represents the only therapy for dangerous heart rhythms such as ventricular fibrillation. It is important to note that these devices are not intended to be used by healthcare professionals only. Quite the contrary, they are predominantly aimed at lay rescuers, so you might have seen them hanging on the walls of airports, train stations, stadiums, and other public places. Everyone should know how to use these devices, because cardiac arrest can happen anywhere, anytime and to anyone, and you might just be the one who can save a life. With the AED Trainer app you can experience how a live AED works, try out different scenarios, and be ready to use an actual device in case of a real emergency.

You can learn more about AEDs by watching our “How to use an AED” video.

Download AED Trainer app from the iTunes store.

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Ladies of the night to use AEDs


A well known Italian newspaper, Corriere della Sera, writes about an interesting initiative among prostitutes in the Ticino region of Switzerland. Lugano, a city in this region, is known to be somewhat of a sex capital with more than 38 sex clubs, which are frequently visited by man from neighboring Italy. Some of these man do not come home alive. Let’s just say they died happy, if you know what I mean 😉

However, this is in no way good for business, so lovely ladies who work in these clubs decided to do something about it. They want to get trained in CPR, as well as equip their work place with automated external defibrillators (AED). An AED is a portable electronic device that automatically diagnoses the potentially life threatening cardiac arrhythmias of ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia in a patient, and is able to treat them through defibrillation, the application of electrical therapy which stops the arrhythmia, allowing the heart to reestablish an effective rhythm.

Way to go girls, you rock! Fantastic initiative indeed.
To learn how to start an AED program in your community, visit American Heart Association if in US, or Arrhythmia Alliance in UK.

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