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Three articles about Pubmed

Three research papers about PubMed were published in open access journals in a short period of time. Two of them are written by the same authors and are dealing with the use of Pubmed among clinicians. The third one talks about two different approaches to teaching PubMed to medical students.

Answers to questions posed during daily patient care are more likely to be answered by UpToDate than PubMed

Hoogendam A, Stalenhoef AF, Robbé PF, Overbeke AJ.

Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Authors observed 40 residents and 30 internists in internal medicine department in an academic medical center while they searched PubMed and UpToDate. They noted the information source used for searching and the time needed to find an answer to the question. What they eventually found was that specialists and residents in internal medicine generally use less than 5 minutes to answer patient-related questions in daily care. Also, more questions are answered using UpToDate than PubMed on all major medical topics.

Analysis of queries sent to PubMed at the point of care: observation of search behaviour in a medical teaching hospital

Hoogendam A, Stalenhoef AF, Robbé PF, Overbeke AJ.

Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

The objectives of this study was to identify queries that are likely to retrieve relevant articles by relating PubMed search techniques and tools to the number of articles retrieved and the selection of articles for further reading. Authors again observed specialists and residents in internal medicine department. They conclude that queries sent to PubMed by physicians during daily medical care contain fewer than three terms. Queries using four to five terms, retrieving less than 161 article titles, are most likely to result in abstract viewing. PubMed search tools are used infrequently by our population and are less effective than the use of four or five terms.

Measuring medical student preference: a comparison of classroom versus online instruction for teaching PubMed

Schimming LM.

Gustave L. and Janet W. Levy Library, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029-6574, USA.

The purpose of this study was to compare satisfaction of medical students learning PubMed entirely online with those attending traditional librarian-led sessions. Skills assessment scores and student feedback forms from 455 first year medical students were analyzed. Student satisfaction improved and PubMed but assessment scores did not change when instruction was offered online. Comments from the students who received online training suggest that the increased control and individual engagement with the web-based content led to their satisfaction with the online tutorial.

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Ivor Kovic

Emergency physician, blogger http://ivor-kovic.com/blog , innovator http://ivormedical.com , researcher, speaker & #CPR instructor. Love technology & design.

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26 October 2008 | internet, medicine, science | Comments