A blog written by Ivor Kovic.....about medicine, science, internet, soap bubbles, design, imaginary friends, books, music for robots, uncreative taglines...

CPR PRO® Device Reduces Rescuer Fatigue during CPR

CPR PRO
We have just published an article in The Journal of Emergency Medicine titled “CPR PRO® Device Reduces Rescuer Fatigue during Continuous Chest Compression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Crossover Trial Using a Manikin Model”

This is the first trial to test the benefits of the device I have invented and have been developing the last couple of years. This device is called CPR PRO and is intended to allow rescuers to performed better chest compressions.

Here is the summary of the article:

1. Why is this topic important?
Rescuers are often required to perform cardiopulmo- nary resuscitation (CPR) for prolonged periods of time, and their fatigue has been shown to cause significant decline in quality of chest compressions, which are crucial for survival of sudden cardiac arrest victims.

2. What does this study attempt to show?
In our randomized crossover trial, health care professionals performed continuous chest compression CPR for 10 min on a manikin to evaluate the impact of a novel CPR PRO! device for manual chest compression on res- cuer fatigue, pain, and CPR quality.

3. What are the key findings?
After using the CPR PRO device, subjects reported less pain in the hands and lower perceived exertion levels, as well as achieving lower average and maximal heart rates during testing, when compared to standard manual CPR. Reduced fatigue and pain has resulted in higher average depth of chest compressions, which declined more slowly over time, than with standard manual CPR.

4. How is patient care impacted?
In a simulated setting, a novel CPR PRO device for manual chest compression has been shown to reduce the work of CPR, which allowed rescuers to achieve signifi- cantly higher quality of chest compressions. Delivering higher quality of chest compressions with minimal interruptions in the clinical setting has a potential to result in better patient outcomes after sudden cardiac arrest.

17 July 2013 | design, medicine, science | No Comments

Taking 100.000 lives per year in the UK

Do you know who is the infamous killer from the title?
AIDS? No
Lung cancer? No
Breast cancer? No
All of them combined? No, its sudden cardiac arrest.

Watch a short documentary about the massive loss of life in the UK due to sudden cardiac arrest and ways that the death rate can be dramatically reduced.

Help the goal to place 500 public access AEDs across the UK.

Learn and perform better quality CPR with our CPR PRO mobile app.
Learn how AEDs work and practice using these lifesaving machines with our AED Trainer app.

8 March 2013 | iphone, medicine | No Comments

Resuscitation 2012


Tomorrow I will be travelling to Vienna, Austria to take part in the Resuscitation 2012 congress organised by the European Resuscitation Council. At this annual congress, which will take place from Thursday 18 October until Saturday 20 October 2012, I will be one of the members of the official Social Media Team. Our team will work HARD&FAST to bring you all the news and updates live during the Resuscitation 2012 congress.

Follow us across all our networks:
Blog
Facebook
Twitter -  use #erc12vienna hashtag to be heard!
Vimeo
Flickr

15 October 2012 | medicine, science | No Comments

Podcast: Bringing CPR into schools

A week ago, Resuscitation Council UK, together with the British Heart Foundation and the famous football player Fabrice Muamba, presented a 100,000-signature petition to Downing Street in order to make CPR mandatory part of school curriculum in the United Kingdom.

European Resuscitation Council spoke with Dr. Andrew Lockey, representative of Resuscitation Council, about their efforts to increase survival rates of sudden cardiac arrest in the UK by educating thousands of school children.

To find out how you can help, visit the BHF website.
Read one of my older posts, to learn what happened to Fabrice Muamba.

18 September 2012 | medicine, science | No Comments

Infographic: Why do some live while others die from cardiac arrest?

Click to enlarge.

Cardiac Arrest Infographic

1 August 2012 | design, medicine | No Comments

Why do medical teams at football matches still suck?

So, I am watching this big football match between Barcelona and Chelsea. Me, 100.000 people at the stadium, and millions at their homes across the World. No football fan would ever want to miss this semi final UEFA Champions League game, which is just a special treat.

Anyway, during the first half an incident happens in the Barcelona’s penalty area. Didier Drogba, Chelsea attacker, was running towards Barcelona’s goal, trying to catch a ball passed to him. He was followed closely by Barcelona’s defender Gerard Pique. However, Barcelona’s goal keeper, Víctor Valdés, got to the ball first, and in the process knocked out Pique. He deliver a forceful blow with his hip to Pique’s head. It was not a pretty sight to see. His head made several uncontrolled movements, first from the blow, and then when he fell to the ground unconscious. OK. So what happens now. Me, I am thinking (and tweeting) they should immobilize this guy immediately, put a cervical collar on as a minimum, and surely not let him continue to play. OK. But what do they do. Some guys from Barcelona’s medical team rush to him, start slapping him. OK. His head is flying in all directions. They are not even considering to maybe at least manually stabilize his neck. So he is lying there unconscious for 30 seconds or so. OK. He starts responding, and all is good for these guys. They get him up on his feet, literally do a 5 second exam on him, and yeah man, no worries you are good to go. Get back in there champ.

Take a look at the video.

Is it just me? Or is this totally unacceptable. And sure, what happens next. He starts feeling quite unwell, and 8 minutes after the incident asks for a substitution. The latest news is that he suffered a light concussion and was being kept overnight in a hospital as a precaution after undergoing medical tests. With the medical care he received on the pitch, he is lucky if you ask me.
Read more »

25 April 2012 | medicine | 2 Comments