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Tag: wireless

Mobile Monday Amsterdam Livestream

I have an update on Mobile Monday event which will take place in Amsterdam, 15 hours from now. The whole event will be streamed live for you enjoyment. It starts at 4 pm and ends at 7 pm (CET). My presentation should begin at 5:55 pm. Be sure to tune in, and even post questions to presenters via Twitter.

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Speaking at Mobile Monday Amsterdam

Mobile Monday Amsterdam I will be speaking at the 14th event of the Mobile Monday chapter in Amsterdam titled Mobile Health. This event will take place on 25th of January with doors opening at 3pm and presentations running until 7pm with a half hour break. Even if you cannot be there, be sure to check out the livestream or watch all videos, talks and presentations afterward on MoMo Amsterdam website. You do not want to miss this, because some extraordinary people will take part in this event. I myself will be talking about mobile technology from a doctor’s standpoint, and try to give an overview of how this technology has influenced the way we treat patients today.

Here is the complete lineup:

Mobile Monday Amsterdam is a chapter of Mobile Monday Global. The chapter has over 3200 members since May, 2007 from different backgrounds (operator, developers, agencies, media, FMCG) all active in the development of the Mobile Lifestyle. Every other month Mobile Monday Amsterdam organizes a network event with visionary speakers and practical cases.

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Wi-Fi for better grades

wi-fi zone
Wi-Fi Alliance conducted a survey among 501 US college students from both large and small schools regarding Wi-Fi access. Findings are very interesting:

  • Nine out of 10 college students in the United States say Wi-Fi access is as essential to education as classrooms and computers.
  • Nearly three in five say they wouldn’t go to a college that doesn’t have free Wi-Fi.
  • 79 percent said that without Wi-Fi access, college would be a lot harder.
  • If forced to choose, nearly half of respondents (48 percent) would give up beer before giving up Wi-Fi.
  • Seventy-two percent would rather wear their school rival’s team colors for a day.
  • More than two in five (44 percent) used Wi-Fi to get a head start on an assignment before a class was finished.
  • Many students reported that the availability of Wi-Fi influences their choice of coffee shop (52 percent), bookstore (42 percent), and restaurant (33 percent).

I wonder about the situation in hospitals and use of Wi-Fi among health workers. With handheld devices, like iPhone, which can provide rich Internet experience without the need to carry a laptop, one could really benefit from Wi-Fi access in hospitals. I sure would be very glad to have it at my work place.

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Computerized Screening for Adolescent Behavioral Concerns

In the latest issue of Pediatrics, official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio have published a paper titled “Trial of Computerized Screening for Adolescent Behavioral Concerns“. This paper talks about the potential benefits of the Health eTouch systems to help pediatricians identify injury risks, depressive symptoms, and substance use among adolescent visiting urban clinics.

A total of 878 primary care patients 11 to 20 years of age where included in the study conducted in waiting rooms of 9 urban clinics. All of the patients where given wireless devices in clinic waiting rooms to answer questions about their health and behavior. The clinics were randomly assigned to have pediatricians receive these screening results either just before face-to-face encounters with patients (immediate-results condition) or 2 to 3 business days later (delayed-results condition).

What the study eventually found was that 59% of the respondents had positive results for 1 or more of the following behavioral concerns: injury risk behaviors, significant depressive symptoms, or substance use. Sixty-eight percent of youths in the immediate-results condition who screened positive were identified as having a problem by their pediatrician. This was significantly higher than the recognition rate of 52% for youths in the delayed-results condition.

Take a look at the video, including a short interview with one of the main researchers, to learn more.

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