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Nintendo Wii Fit for physiotherapy

Wii Fit

Interesting press release regarding use of Nintendo Wii Fit to benefit young patients undergoing physiotherapy.

Two Lancashire hospitals have taken the unusual step of introducing the Wii Fit computer console into their Physiotherapy Departments to aid the rehabilitation of young patients.

The idea was the brainchild of a 12-year old patient and staff at Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, which run Chorley and South Ribble Hospital and Royal Preston Hospital, have purchased two game consoles and fitness games to benefit youngsters undergoing treatment.

The Nintendo Wii Fit aims to promote health and fitness through active games.

Lesley Walters, Head of Physiotherapy, Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said: “We provide a paediatric and adolescent physiotherapy service. One of our patients suggested it would be a good idea and new and fun way to get youngsters to undertake physiotherapy.

“Physiotherapy sessions for children and young people often use play or diversion techniques to get them to overcome any discomfort or stiffness they may feel.

“Wii Fit is a great way of using computer games to stimulate interest while performing exercises which can be uncomfortable.

“We encourage people to have fun while undergoing physiotherapy and the use of a computer games console which encourages fitness is a fantastic innovation for physiotherapy.

“Two consoles have been purchased and we will be using them in our paediatric and adolescent physiotherapy services at Chorley and South Ribble Hospital and Royal Preston Hospital. It is being used in an increasing number of NHS Physiotherapy departments and I’m sure that it will prove very popular in Lancashire.”

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Wii Fun Center

Wii Fun Center
Nintendo and Starlight Starbright Children’s Foundation have been partners for more than 15 years, bringing Fun Center mobile entertainment units to children staying in hospitals. Recently they introduced a completely new Fun Center, based around Nintendo Wii, which can be rolled right up to the side of patient’s beds or anywhere in a hospital setting.

A Fun Center is a mobile entertainment unit containing a flat-screen television, DVD player, and Nintendo Wii™ system.  Whether hospitalized children are nervously awaiting surgery, sitting restlessly during a long treatment, or feeling lonely in their hospital room, the Fun Center helps them cope by providing endless hours of fun and distraction. To date, more than 5,000 Fun Centers have been sponsored by companies, foundations and individuals and are being enjoyed at hospitals across North America.

The great thing is that you can donate a Fun Center to a hospital of your choice. Just be sure to order two, one for the children and other for the staff :-). Sponsorship is currently $4,250 which includes the cost of the unit, shipping and administration, and repair and maintenance for the life of the Fun Center by dedicated Starlight staff.

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Wii for surgeons

Q&A with Dr. Mark Smith and a news report regarding use of Nintendo Wii to train surgeons from News 8 Austin.

Mark Smith, M.D., a gynecological surgeon at Banner Good Samaritan Hospital in Phoenix, explains how the Nintendo Wii is helping train new surgeons.

Q: Part of your job is to train residents learning to be surgeons?

Smith: Yes. I have been in teaching for over 20 years and one of my responsibilities is training residents in surgery.

Q: When you started your job did you ever think you would be using video games to train?

Smith: I have never thought I’d be in video games to this extent. We have surgical simulators in virtual reality, but this has taken it to a whole new level, which is exciting.

Q: What have you found that the Nintendo Wii can do for practicing surgeons and for people learning how to perform surgery?

Smith: One of the problems we’ve had over the years is we had no method to teach surgeons surgical skills without going into surgery. We now have simulators that help them develop those skills. The problem is they are incredibly expensive — like a flight simulator for a pilot. This gives us a much less costly way to train these fine motor skills that the surgeons employ during surgery.

Q: Can a video game really help somebody improve as a surgeon?

Smith: We used cyber gloves which computerize hand movements of surgeons and we put those on surgeons. We have data on that. We put them on people playing the Wii. There is a very, very high correlation between the two and this is documented statistically.

Q: What did you find happens to the skills of people when they train this way as opposed to those who don’t train this way?

Smith: They develop an increased efficiency, less errors, more fluid movements … they’re just better.

Q: What has been the traditional method of training?

Smith: Up until the last ten years, they learned in actual surgery … what’s called the apprentice method — standing beside an expert surgeon, watching and helping to do it.

Q: Does this generation of doctors, having grown up playing video games, tend to be better at this training?

Smith: Actually, they tend to be better, but that’s not all of it. We can expand the skills that they have developed growing up. They certainly jump in a lot quicker. There is less training to start. For instance, in laparoscopy, which has differences than the more traditional type surgery, but it’s really as much an innate ability as it is for what they’ve grown up with.

Q: Have you adapted the Wii to use actual surgical tools?

Smith: We are using the actual tools. What some people don’t realize is there are very basic skills we have to teach. If you teach someone to drive a car, you first have to teach them how to put the gas down … put the break down. You have to learn all these skills before you can drive a car.

Q: What kind of skills are they learning by doing this?

Smith: Very fine motor skills … very precise, exact movements that surgeons need to know and have the ability to do. This teaches them those fine movements — fine motor skills — so that they are very proficient in those types of skills when they go into surgery.

Q: What did your study on this new training technique show?

Smith: Our initial pilot study … we showed a 50 percent improvement in their surgical skill level just by playing on the Wii.

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