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Ultrasound guided peripheral venous access video lecture

My dear readers, if you even exist anymore :-), I have neglected you. For that I am sorry. My last post was more than a year ago. A year in which I maybe some big changes in my life and career. I have moved to the United Kingdom and currently have a new, cool and shiny job. My time is divided between emergency department and medical simulation suite. So I get to do all the things I love, seeing patients, teaching others, playing with high fidelity manikins and conducting small and sweet IT projects.

During the last year or so, I have gone nuts for point of care ultrasound (POCUS). When I am in the emergency department use of ultrasound jumps by 300%. I use it very often and can say that in many ways it has revolutionised my practice. So I wanted to share my knowledge and excitement of its use. I started creating video lectures, as well as combined e-learning courses at my hospital, of all the ways ultrasound can help you make a difference for your patients.

So, insert drum roll here, here it is! My first video lecture demonstrating how to use ultrasound to gain peripheral venous access. Hope you’ll like it, because there are others following soon, and I intend to bore you with them as well 😉

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The Usefulness of Sonohysterography

By-line:
This article is contributed by Sarah Scrafford, who regularly writes on the topic of how to become a pharmacy technician. She invites your questions, comments and freelancing job inquiries at her email address.

A recent study conducted at the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia has found that sonohysterography (SHG) is a highly effective transvaginal ultrasound technique that improves the ability of doctors to diagnose adenomyosis, a condition that causes severe pelvic pain combined with abnormal and unexplained vaginal bleeding.

SHG is a relatively new technique that allows medical practitioners to view a woman’s uterine cavity more clearly. A soft, plastic catheter is placed in the cervix in conjunction with transvaginal ultrasound, and a sterile saline infusion passed through this tube expands the uterus and also provides a contrast to the lining, thus giving doctors a better idea of what the problem really is.

  • Sonohysterography is especially useful in treating women with infertility – it helps determine the presence of polyps, fibroids or tumors that prevent conception.
  • Besides, it allows doctors to examine the uterine cavity before any surgery like a hysterectomy or a D&C procedure.
  • It also helps in investigating unexplained infertility and repeated miscarriages.
  • It’s a good diagnostic tool to explore unexplained vaginal bleeding in pre and post menopausal women.
  • It allows examination and assessment of the endometrium and reveals endometrial abnormalities.
  • A sonohysterography that’s performed before a suggested hysterectomy can sometimes help you avoid the hysterectomy altogether. So you’re saved the cost, mental stress, physical pain, and recovery from a surgery.

The main advantages of a sonohysterography are:

  • It’s painless and can be administered in a normal ultrasound scan room
  • It does not require the patient to be sedated or under the influence of anesthesia.
  • It is not as expensive as an MRI scan which is normally used to investigate abnormal bleeding
  • It is commonly available at most healthcare facilities.
  • It helps avoid invasive diagnostic procedures
  • It has no side effects and is not very uncomfortable for the patient
  • Diagnosis is quick
  • There are no complications to be worried about

Reference:
Verma SK, Lev-Toaff AS, Baltarowich OH, Bergin D, Verma M, Mitchell DG
Clinical Observations. Adenomyosis: Sonohysterography with MRI Correlation
Am. J. Roentgenol. ; 192: 10.2214/AJR.08.1405

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