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AirStrip CRITICAL CARE

The Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) is taking place in San Francisco right now. On the first day Apple introduced the new iPhone 3G S. They also continued their tradition of presenting some interesting upcoming applications.

AirStrip Technologies has presented its new medical app called Critical Care. I really don’t have any comments at this moment other than WATCH THE VIDEO IT WILL BLOW YOUR MIND!

AirStrip CRITICAL CARE features include:

  • Virtual Views – Remote, virtual real-time monitoring of live cardiac rhythm strips and other waveform data such as pulse oximetry, end tidal CO2 and peak ventilator pressures.
  • Strip Zooming – The zoom feature maintains relative size of waveforms and the background grid allows for easy assessment and measurements.
  • Automated Caliper – The automated caliper measures designated intervals, both automatically and manually.
  • Strip Scrolling – The scroll function allows users to quickly scroll through stored waveform data, such as telemetry strips.
  • Patient Data Display – Tidal volume, airway pressure, flow and volume readings are also available in virtual real-time, directly from patient monitors.

AirStrip already has one interesting application available in iTunes store called AirStrip OB. This application, intended for obstetricians, delivers vital patient waveform data — including fetal heartbeat and maternal contraction patterns — in virtual real-time directly from the hospital labor and delivery unit to a doctor’s iPhone.

If you are interested you can watch the whole Apple WWDC 2009 Keynote Address.

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Swine flu outbreak in iTunes store

There seam to be more swine flu apps in iTunes store than confirmed swine flu cases throughout the World :). As of today, there are 25 iPhone applications related to swine influenza available in iTunes store.

Swine Flu iTunes

Eleven of these apps are free, while the other 14 cost somewhere between $0.99 and $1.99. Most of these apps are either trackers, meaning that they show you maps of swine flu cases, or RSS aggregators, bringing you the latest swine influenza news. I tried all of the free apps, and can tell you that none of them really impressed me. Some are better designed than others, some offer more functions, but none are great. For example, Swine Flu Tracker Map looks great, but its map loads so painfully slow that you want to shoot yourself. On the other hand, The Swine Flu Tracker (notice how creative the names of these apps are) doesn’t offer any additional features, but has the fastest loading map. As for news aggregators, my favorite would have to be H1N1 (Swine Flu) Update.

Please excuse me now, I am very busy developing my own swine flu app, which I am going to call TA DA !!! Swine Flu, I’m Tracking U.

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Year in Review 2008: Best in Health by WorldChanging

WorldChangingWorldChanging brings stories of the most important and innovative new tools, models and ideas for building a bright green future. Their articles are just amazing, and for the end of 2008 they decided to rediscovered some of the great events, innovations, interviews and debates that they covered in the previous year. They wrote a series of articles titled Year in Review, which was divided into several categories like best in climate change, energy, and of course best in health, food and society.

Here are the summaries of their best health stories from 2008.

Facebook, Coca-Cola and Medical Aid in Africa

Simon Berry has an idea. Why not persuade Coca-Cola to dedicate a fraction of its distribution network to carry medicines for simple, widespread and life-threatening ailments like diarrhea. Why Coca Cola? Because even the most remote African communities have limitless access to bottles of Coca-Cola.

Making Social Equity an Issue of Public Health

This article discusses the issue of health equity. How is it possible that there is a 28 year difference in life expectancy between the most and least fortunate residents of Glasgow, Scotland?

The Transformative 120: Text Messages Prove a South African HIV Lifeline

Six million South Africans are infected with the HIV, but just one in ten are currently in treatment. Project Masiluleke sends mobile customers texts pointing them to the National AIDS Helpline (0800-012-322) and HIV911 (0860-448-911).

Worldchanging Interview: Dr. Sanjay Gupta on Health Solutions

Interview with Dr. Sanjay Gupta, chief medical correspondent at CNN. He is a practicing neurosurgeon and award-winning journalist who is dedicated to helping improve public health and spreading awareness of health-related environmental issues.

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iPhone theme for my blog

I installed a specific blog theme only for iPhone/iPod Touch, so my blog is now more easier to read and navigate with these mobile devices. This is something worth doing considering the fact that iPhone is top mobile internet browser in the USA. Of course, people can access your blog using iPhone’s built in browser Safari but this customization really improves their experience.

Take a look at the difference.

iphone theme
iphone theme

If you want to get this feature for your blog and are using WordPress to run it, follow these simple instructions.

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CME application for iPhone

Company called ReachMD has released their Continuing Medical Education (CME) application for the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch. This app is just great for all you busy healthcare practitioners who want to learn something new and earn free CME credits. After you install it on your iPhone you have to register, choose the program you are interested in, listen to it, and take the test. Very simple and convenient.

Take a look at some screen shots.

ReachMDReachMDReachMDReachMDReachMD

Download ReachMD app for free.

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Sign Language Over Slow Cellular Networks

Sure you might be enjoying your new iPhone or any other cool modern cell phone, but things aren’t so simple for the deaf and hard-of-hearing people. Now a group at the University of Washington has developed software that for the first time enables deaf and hard-of-hearing Americans to use sign language over a mobile phone.

This is the first time two-way real-time video communication has been demonstrated over cell phones in the United States. Since posting a video of the working prototype on YouTube, deaf people around the country have been writing on a daily basis.

“A lot of people are excited about this,” said principal investigator Eve Riskin, a UW professor of electrical engineering.
For mobile communication, deaf people now communicate by cell phone using text messages. “But the point is you want to be able to communicate in your native language,” Riskin said. “For deaf people that’s American Sign Language.”

Video is much better than text-messaging because it’s faster and it’s better at conveying emotion, said Jessica DeWitt, a UW undergraduate in psychology who is deaf and is a collaborator on the MobileASL project. She says a large part of her communication is with facial expressions, which are transmitted over the video phones.

Low data transmission rates on U.S. cellular networks, combined with limited processing power on mobile devices, have so far prevented real-time video transmission with enough frames per second that it could be used to transmit sign language. Communication rates on United States cellular networks allow about one tenth of the data rates common in places such as Europe and Asia (sign language over cell phones is already possible in Sweden and Japan).

Even as faster networks are becoming more common in the United States, there is still a need for phones that would operate on the slower systems.

“The faster networks are not available everywhere,” said doctoral student Anna Cavender. “They also cost more. We don’t think it’s fair for someone who’s deaf to have to pay more for his or her cell phone than someone who’s hearing.”

Learn more about the MobileASL project.

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