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Save water and your life when you shower

Just 2.5% of the planet’s water is fresh and less than 1% is available for human consumption because the rest is stored in the form of ice bergs. Think about this the next time you’re taking a shower. The average shower uses 64 liters of water, but this number can be even higher. Modern power shower can easily use 20 liters of water a minute, meaning more than five minutes in the shower could use more than 100 liters. Astonishing figures!

CueThere are some cheap and smart devices on the market which can help you save water, money and maybe even your life. CUE the breast self-exam reminder is an electronic breast self-exam reminder, a shower timer, a clock, a doctor’s visit reminder. It helps you reduce the time you spent in the shower and the amount of water you use, but it also reminds you to perform your breast self-exam seven days after your period begins, when your breasts are least tender. With it you also receive the instructional DVD, “Performing Your Breast Self-Exam”.

powerdropSimply timing your shower is a positive step forward, but it doesn’t tell you how much water you saved. Another device called Eco Showerdrop can do just that. Before you start using it, you calibrate it to measure your own particular shower. This way you can set your goal to save liters and liters of precious water. On the other hand, Eco Showerdrop doesn’t offer reminders.

Shower or not, woman should regularly perform breast self exams. Five Steps of a Breast Self-Exam from Breastcancer.org is a good place to start.

Via Gizmodo and SmartPlanet.

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Brush up your clinical skills with video podcasts

Podcasts can be a great educational tool. They are a free video or audio series, like a TV or radio show that you download and play, whenever you chose, on your computer, TV, iPod, iPhone or other portable media player. There are numerous podcast directories which can help you find interesting podcasts. One of the most popular and certainly the one which started it all is iTunes Store. Apart from offering music, TV shows, movies and iPhone/iPod applications for sale, it features thousands of different podcasts. Among them many are related to medicine, and some can even help you improve your clinical examination skills. To be able to watch these podcasts, you will need to have iTunes installed on your computer and preferably a broadband Internet connection. Some of the episodes can be quite big and take a long time to download on a slow connection.

Here is my selection of video podcasts from the iTunes store which can help you brush up your clinical skills.

Clinical Examinations
by Professor Karim Mearan
Imperial College London, Faculty of Medicine

Exam
This podcast currently has 5 episodes featuring a physician performing following examination:

  • Cardiology
  • Respiratory
  • Cranial nerves
  • Neurological – lower limbs
  • Neurological – upper limbs

Integrated Clinical Method
by ICM Team
Swansea University Medical School

exam
So far, there are in total 10 episodes with two physician demonstrating different exams:

  • Cardiovascular system
  • Respiratory system
  • Abdominal
  • Lumbar spine
  • Cervical spine
  • Ankle and foot
  • Knee
  • Hip
  • Elbow
  • Shoulder

Uva Clinical Skills Videos
by Office of Medical Education
University of Virginia

exam
In this series you will find clinical examination videos, but also videos depicting medical procedures and tips for taking patient’s history.

Clinical exams

  • Knee
  • Low back
  • Shoulder
  • Upper extremities
  • Lower extremities
  • Skin
  • Vital signs
  • Chest
  • HEENT
  • Cardiac
  • Abdominal
  • Neurologic
  • Ophtalmoscopic

Medical procedures

  • Central line placement
  • Intubation
  • Standard venipuncture
  • Butterfly venipuncture

History taking

  • Sexual history
  • Interview with sexual health issues

Neonatology
by Rijeka University School of Medicine
neonatology exam
While all of the above mentioned podcasts demonstrate clinical examination of adult patients, this one show you how to examine newborn babies. Until today, 11 videos are made available demonstrating clinical examination of primitive reflexes.

  • Introduction: Primitive Reflexes
  • Walking reflex
  • Tonic neck reflex
  • Sucking reflex
  • Rooting reflex
  • Pull to Sit
  • Moro Response
  • Magnet reflex
  • Grasp response
  • Galant’s reflex
  • Crawling reflex

You’re still here? Go on, hurry and download some of these excellent podcasts and become a better clinical examiner.

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Neonatology vodcast

Couple of months ago my colleague Ileana Lulic, also a medical doctor from Croatia, and myself started to produce a vodcast in collaboration with Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at the University Hospital Rijeka. Vodcast is essentially a video podcast, online delivery of video on demand content via RSS feeds. Our vodcast was conceived with an idea to offer a quick review of the clinical examination of the newborn infant. Until today we have published 11 videos, in both Croatian and English, demonstrating the proper way to inspect primitive reflexes in the newborn infant, and 2 videos demonstrating procedures in neonatology (lumbar puncture and umbilical vein catheterization), currently only in Croatian.

You can view our videos here. To change between videos just change the slide at the left bottom.

Additionally you can visit our YouTube channel, our page at the iTunes store or subscribe to our RSS feed.

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