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iPod Touch to every medical student

ipod touch

I have been writing about benefits of using the iPhone and iPod Touch for quite some time. But of course I am not the only one who thinks that these devices are perfect for doctors and medical students.

The Ohio State University Medical Center has decided to provide each medical student a standard iPod touch, equipped with specific medical software programs planned by the OSU College of Medicine, over the next two years. I think their initiative is just great.

Here is their press release:

OSU USES HAND-HELD TECHNOLOGY TO STRENGTHEN PATIENT CARE

iPod TouchWith the use of portable media players, medical students at The Ohio State University Medical Center can now carry the equivalent of heavy textbooks and medical references in their lab coat pockets. The portable media players are part of the current technology making it easier for medical students at OSU to navigate classroom lectures and clinical duties with patients.

Justin Harper, a third-year medical student, saw the Apple iPod touch and helped launch a program for OSU medical students. The Ohio State University College of Medicine is the only college currently using the iPod touch to give to all its students for educational purposes.

“The iPod touch has the potential to positively impact both medical education and the care provided to patients at the bedside,” said Dr. Catherine Lucey, vice dean for education. “The personal digital assistant puts a wealth of information at the fingertips of our students. They can study when they want and where they want. If they are seeing a patient and a question arises, they can find the answer instantly, to share with them.”

This hand-held technology can provide graphics, which allow students to refer to resources such as high quality images of each organ and nerve in the body. They can review images from multiple angles, access videos of medical treatments or surgical procedures, and request a review quiz at any time. In addition, detailed photographs on portable media players can help patients identify their current medications and immediately obtain a list of all potential drug interactions.

Over the next two years, each Ohio State medical student will receive a standard iPod touch, equipped with specific medical software programs planned by the OSU College of Medicine.

According to Lucey, this effort continues OSU Medical Center’s leadership in the use of technology to improve the quality of education and patient care.

“We are committed to providing our students with the best tools available, to help them provide outstanding patient care,” said Lucey. “I am delighted that OSU Medical Center is on the cutting edge of a trend that will undoubtedly expand to medical schools across the country.”

The Ohio State University College of Medicine also provides podcasts of medical school lectures, making all lectures and medical school curricula available on line, for review at any time. Students have access to the most recently published research articles and the current medical literature.

Thank you Luka for the tip.
Source Cult of Mac.

Here are some of my earlier posts about the iPhone/ipod Touch:

Why is iPhone perfect for doctors
Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations on iPhone
CME application for iPhone

To read all of my posts related to the iPhone/ipod Touch access my iPhone category.

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Three articles about Pubmed

Three research papers about PubMed were published in open access journals in a short period of time. Two of them are written by the same authors and are dealing with the use of Pubmed among clinicians. The third one talks about two different approaches to teaching PubMed to medical students.

Answers to questions posed during daily patient care are more likely to be answered by UpToDate than PubMed

Hoogendam A, Stalenhoef AF, Robbé PF, Overbeke AJ.

Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Authors observed 40 residents and 30 internists in internal medicine department in an academic medical center while they searched PubMed and UpToDate. They noted the information source used for searching and the time needed to find an answer to the question. What they eventually found was that specialists and residents in internal medicine generally use less than 5 minutes to answer patient-related questions in daily care. Also, more questions are answered using UpToDate than PubMed on all major medical topics.

Analysis of queries sent to PubMed at the point of care: observation of search behaviour in a medical teaching hospital

Hoogendam A, Stalenhoef AF, Robbé PF, Overbeke AJ.

Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

The objectives of this study was to identify queries that are likely to retrieve relevant articles by relating PubMed search techniques and tools to the number of articles retrieved and the selection of articles for further reading. Authors again observed specialists and residents in internal medicine department. They conclude that queries sent to PubMed by physicians during daily medical care contain fewer than three terms. Queries using four to five terms, retrieving less than 161 article titles, are most likely to result in abstract viewing. PubMed search tools are used infrequently by our population and are less effective than the use of four or five terms.

Measuring medical student preference: a comparison of classroom versus online instruction for teaching PubMed

Schimming LM.

Gustave L. and Janet W. Levy Library, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029-6574, USA.

The purpose of this study was to compare satisfaction of medical students learning PubMed entirely online with those attending traditional librarian-led sessions. Skills assessment scores and student feedback forms from 455 first year medical students were analyzed. Student satisfaction improved and PubMed but assessment scores did not change when instruction was offered online. Comments from the students who received online training suggest that the increased control and individual engagement with the web-based content led to their satisfaction with the online tutorial.

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Virtual heart

University College Hospital in London and Glassworks, a leading digital animation company, have developed the first easy to use, accurate, real time, 3D computer generated transoesophageal echocardiography simulator named HeartWorks. They believe this original teaching tool will revolutionize the teaching of electrocardiography and I can’t help but agree. The thing looks too real, like it is going to fall from the computer screen right into your hands.

Take a look at the video from Reuters.

Tip: Gizmodo

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CME application for iPhone

Company called ReachMD has released their Continuing Medical Education (CME) application for the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch. This app is just great for all you busy healthcare practitioners who want to learn something new and earn free CME credits. After you install it on your iPhone you have to register, choose the program you are interested in, listen to it, and take the test. Very simple and convenient.

Take a look at some screen shots.

ReachMDReachMDReachMDReachMDReachMD

Download ReachMD app for free.

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Medicine 2.0 Blog Carnival Edition #33

Medicine 2.0 blog carnival
Welcome to the 33rd edition of Medicine 2.0 blog carnival that focuses on the integration of web 2.0 with our current practice of medicine. I am delighted to be your host this time around and would like to thank Berci Mesko for this opportunity.

I love numbers and 33 is a very beautiful number with many meanings. For this occasion I decided to play around with Medicine 2.0 blog carnival logo, so my dear iMac computer used numbers and complex calculations to transformed it. I took snapshots of specific segments from all of the blogs participating in this edition of Medicine 2.0 blog carnival and from these images a new mosaic image resembling the carnival’s logo has been assembled.

Thanks to the submissions from various bloggers, we have some pretty interesting articles for you. Lets begin immediately, cause I know you are curious.

Interviews

Amy Tenderich, author of DiabetesMine, wanted to know, among other things, if mainstream commercial health platforms from companies like Google and Microsoft are really useful for people with specific chronic illnesses? She conducted two interviews to satisfy her curiosity. First she interviewed Missy Krasner, Product Marketing Manager for Google Health, and later she did the same with Keith Toussaint, Senior Program Manager with Microsoft HealthVault.

People from SugarStats talked with Jennifer McCabe Gorman, one of Health 2.0’s most ‘visible’ online evangelist as they called her. By the way Jennifer wants you to know that her blog, Health Management Rx, is not dead. The reason her posts have been slow is because she is intensively preparing for Health 2.0: User-Generated Healthcare conference, which will be held in San Francisco, California from October 22nd – 23rd 2008.

I have on the other hand conducted an interview with Dr. R.A. Brest van Kempen. This gentleman happens to be the CEO of RS TechMedic, a Dutch company producing medical devices. In the interview he has announced the development of software which will enable physicians to monitor their patients in real time using only an iPhone.

Personal Health Records

Canadian EMR draws our attention to an article published in the Globe and Mail which highlights clinical information that will soon be available to patients in Alberta.

John Sharp, publisher of eHealth blog, has informed us that Google Health has added some web accessibility features to support text readers and enable access to the blind.

Bob Coffield, a health care lawyer and blogger has posted a very interesting article on his Health Care Law Blog. Title of this article, which he co-authored with Jud DeLoss, is “The Rise of the Personal Health Record: Panacea or Pitfall for Health Information” and it has been originally published in the October edition of the Health Lawyers News, a publication of the American Health Lawyers Association (AHLA). Be sure to read it if you want to learn more about legal issues around PHRs.

Social media

Ves Dimov of Clinical Cases and Images Blog shows us the beautiful flower of Internet conversation and dares us to count how many petals we have.

Kevin Pho, better known as Kevin M.D., found an article in Newsweek that talks about the potential of Web 2.0 applications in patient-physician communication.

Digital Pathology Blog asks and tries to answer the following question: Is image sharing “social networking” that should be blocked?

Scott Shreeve writes about his relationship with Twitter in Aint that Tweet?

Berci Mesko thinks you might like and find useful the Twitter directory called Just Tweet It.

Gunther Eysenbach, Editor-in-Chief and publisher of the Journal of Medical Internet Research, presents the research paper “Examining the Medical Blogosphere: An Online Survey of Medical Bloggers” and reflectes on the presentation of Kevin Clauson at the Medicine 2.0 congress in Toronto.

New websites

Medgadgdet informs about Pediatric Care Online, designed around the daily clinical needs of pediatric offices.

Joshua Schwimmer tells us about the new nephrology blog named Precious Bodily Fluids.

Change for the better

Dave deBronkart of e-patinets.net admires extraordinary bravery and integrity of the people from Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center who performed a procedure on the wrong body part and openly shared what happened on their blog.

Medical Education Blog presents a new approach to thinking about how we teach medical students called Application Oriented Curriculum.

There you have it. You read some interesting articles and during the process have boosted your brains, according to new research suggesting that the simple act of Googling may be good for your brain health.

For the end, I would like you to just think about two things. Submitting your articles to one of the future Medicine 2.0 blog carnivals or even hosting one yourself. Everything you need to know can be found on Medicine 2.0 blog carnival.

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Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations on iPhone

Modality has just released their two new educational apps for the iPhone. They started with fantastic Netter’s anatomy flash cards and now they moved on to one of the most respected step-by-step guides to general surgery procedures, Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations. Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations consists of several parts devoted to gastrointestinal, miscellaneous abdominal, vascular, gynecologic and additional procedures. So far Modality has released upper and lower gastrointestinal procedures.

Here is what they say….

The classic guide to general surgery procedures is now available for the iPhone and iPod touch. Based on the renowned Eighth Edition as available on AccessSurgery, Zollinger’s iPhone applications allow you to access step-by-step instructions and superb line drawings for numerous general surgical procedures. Some procedures also include fully-narrated, slideshow presentations outlining each step in the procedure, from Intro and Indications through Post-Operative Care.

Using the intuitive iPhone interface, you can navigate through detailed images with the flick of a finger, pinch to zoom, and tap to read easy-to-follow instructions for each procedure.

Procedures included in these two apps….

Gastrointestinal: Upper:

• Closure of Perforation—Subphrenic Abscess
• Enteroenterostomy, Stapled
• Enterostomy
• Fundoplication
• Fundoplication, Laparoscopic*
• Gastrectomy, Hofmeister Method
• Gastrectomy, Polya Method
• Gastrectomy, Subtotal
• Gastrectomy, Subtotal—Omentectomy
• Gastrojejunostomy*
• Gastrostomy*
• Hemigastrectomy, Billroth I Method
• Hemigastrectomy, Billroth I Stapled
• Hemigastrectomy, Billroth II, Stapled
• Laparotomy, the Closure
• Laparotomy, the Opening
• Loop Ileostomy*
• Meckel’s Diverticulectomy
• Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy—PEG*
• Pyloromyotomy—Intussusception
• Pyloroplasty, Stapled
• Pyloroplasty—Gastroduodenostomy
• Resection of Small Intestine
• Resection of Small Intestine, Stapled
• Resection of Small Intestine, Stapled (Alternative Methods)
• Roux-en-Y Gastrojejunostomy
• Total Gastrectomy
• Total Gastrectomy, Stapled
• Vagotomy
• Vagotomy, Subdiaphragmatic Approach
• Zenker’s Diverticulectomy
• Anatomy of the Large Intestine

Gastrointestinal: Lower:

• Abdominoperineal Resection
• Abdominoperineal Resection, Total Mesorectal Excision
• Abdominoperineal Resection—Perineal Resection
• Anterior Resection of Rectosigmoid: End-to-End Anastomosis*
• Anterior Resection of Rectosigmoid: Side-to-End Anastomosis (Baker)*
• Anterior Resection, Stapled
• Appendectomy*
• Appendectomy, Laparoscopic*
• Closure of Colostomy
• Colectomy, Left, End-to-End Anastomosis*
• Colectomy, Right*
• Colon Anastomosis, Stapled
• Drainage of Ischiorectal Abscess—Excision of Fistula in Ano
• Ileoanal Anastomosis
• Surgical Anatomy of Large Intestine
• Total Colectomy*
• Transverse Colostomy*
• Excision of Pilonidal Sinus
• Injection and Excision of Hemorrhoids
• Rectal Prolapse, Perineal Repair*

modality atlasmodality atlas
First thing I noticed is that these apps are very large. They have 264 and 140 MB. Also, they are a bit pricey. Each costs 34.99 dollars. The whole book would cost you 180 dollars at Amazon.com. It is up to you to decide, but there is no denying that Zollinger’s Atlas looks great on the iPhone and is, of course, so much cooler, among other things. Imagine how your next date will be impressed when you show her how to perform Anterior Resection of Rectosigmoid just before the movie. OK maybe not, but your geek surgery residence friends sure will.

Here are some photos.

modality atlasmodality atlasmodality atlasmodality atlasmodality atlas

Scalpel in one hand, sterilized iPhone in the other, and start cutting.

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