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Dr. Awesome, Microsurgeon M.D.

This is a game for the iPhone for which I wanted to do a video review, but I see that others have already done it, so I will just embed their video.

Here is a description of this game:
Prepare to go micro! You are Dr. Awesome, the world’s most popular microsurgeon. A deadly strain of virus is attacking the population and you are tasked to defeat it before time runs out!

You must perform microsurgery to isolate and eradicate the mutagens that have infected your friends, personalized from your contact list. Cut and trap the offending viruses with your accelerometer-guided micro scalpel, avoid disruptive virus counter attacks and collect various power-ups to succeed. You’ll need a need steady hand to be the best!

So, the game doesn’t make any sense from a medical perspective. You are a surgeon cutting cells with some kind of micro laser ??!!##?? to kill the viruses. Although, Rocket Scientist’s Laser Scalpel Targets Individual Cells article from Wired got me thinking. One cool feature of this game is that it incorporates with your contact list on the phone, so your friends become your patients. Scary.

Take a look at the video review:


Dr. Awesome iPhone Review from Kevin Rose on Vimeo.

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Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations on iPhone

Modality has just released their two new educational apps for the iPhone. They started with fantastic Netter’s anatomy flash cards and now they moved on to one of the most respected step-by-step guides to general surgery procedures, Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations. Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations consists of several parts devoted to gastrointestinal, miscellaneous abdominal, vascular, gynecologic and additional procedures. So far Modality has released upper and lower gastrointestinal procedures.

Here is what they say….

The classic guide to general surgery procedures is now available for the iPhone and iPod touch. Based on the renowned Eighth Edition as available on AccessSurgery, Zollinger’s iPhone applications allow you to access step-by-step instructions and superb line drawings for numerous general surgical procedures. Some procedures also include fully-narrated, slideshow presentations outlining each step in the procedure, from Intro and Indications through Post-Operative Care.

Using the intuitive iPhone interface, you can navigate through detailed images with the flick of a finger, pinch to zoom, and tap to read easy-to-follow instructions for each procedure.

Procedures included in these two apps….

Gastrointestinal: Upper:

• Closure of Perforation—Subphrenic Abscess
• Enteroenterostomy, Stapled
• Enterostomy
• Fundoplication
• Fundoplication, Laparoscopic*
• Gastrectomy, Hofmeister Method
• Gastrectomy, Polya Method
• Gastrectomy, Subtotal
• Gastrectomy, Subtotal—Omentectomy
• Gastrojejunostomy*
• Gastrostomy*
• Hemigastrectomy, Billroth I Method
• Hemigastrectomy, Billroth I Stapled
• Hemigastrectomy, Billroth II, Stapled
• Laparotomy, the Closure
• Laparotomy, the Opening
• Loop Ileostomy*
• Meckel’s Diverticulectomy
• Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy—PEG*
• Pyloromyotomy—Intussusception
• Pyloroplasty, Stapled
• Pyloroplasty—Gastroduodenostomy
• Resection of Small Intestine
• Resection of Small Intestine, Stapled
• Resection of Small Intestine, Stapled (Alternative Methods)
• Roux-en-Y Gastrojejunostomy
• Total Gastrectomy
• Total Gastrectomy, Stapled
• Vagotomy
• Vagotomy, Subdiaphragmatic Approach
• Zenker’s Diverticulectomy
• Anatomy of the Large Intestine

Gastrointestinal: Lower:

• Abdominoperineal Resection
• Abdominoperineal Resection, Total Mesorectal Excision
• Abdominoperineal Resection—Perineal Resection
• Anterior Resection of Rectosigmoid: End-to-End Anastomosis*
• Anterior Resection of Rectosigmoid: Side-to-End Anastomosis (Baker)*
• Anterior Resection, Stapled
• Appendectomy*
• Appendectomy, Laparoscopic*
• Closure of Colostomy
• Colectomy, Left, End-to-End Anastomosis*
• Colectomy, Right*
• Colon Anastomosis, Stapled
• Drainage of Ischiorectal Abscess—Excision of Fistula in Ano
• Ileoanal Anastomosis
• Surgical Anatomy of Large Intestine
• Total Colectomy*
• Transverse Colostomy*
• Excision of Pilonidal Sinus
• Injection and Excision of Hemorrhoids
• Rectal Prolapse, Perineal Repair*

modality atlasmodality atlas
First thing I noticed is that these apps are very large. They have 264 and 140 MB. Also, they are a bit pricey. Each costs 34.99 dollars. The whole book would cost you 180 dollars at Amazon.com. It is up to you to decide, but there is no denying that Zollinger’s Atlas looks great on the iPhone and is, of course, so much cooler, among other things. Imagine how your next date will be impressed when you show her how to perform Anterior Resection of Rectosigmoid just before the movie. OK maybe not, but your geek surgery residence friends sure will.

Here are some photos.

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Scalpel in one hand, sterilized iPhone in the other, and start cutting.

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Dr. Rossi has done it again

Valentino Rossi is the famous Italian professional motorcycle racer and his fans call him “The Doctor” (Il Dottore). He is one of the most successful motorcycle racers of all time and recently he won the Grand Prix of Japan and claimed his sixth MotoGP world championship. Well, congratulations Dr. Rossi.

From Wikipedia…
Since his dominance in 500 cc and MotoGP, Rossi has used the nickname “The Doctor.” This has been attributed to his “cold and clinical dismantling of his opponents” as well as his cool and calm composure in racing compared to his frenetic days in 125 cc and 250 cc where his performance was erratic and dangerous, resulting in numerous crashes. There are two theories as to why Rossi is entitled “The Doctor”, one is Rossi adopted the nickname upon having earned a degree, which in Italy entitles one to use the title “Doctor”. Another, as spoken by Graziano himself, “The Doctor because, I don’t think there is a particular reason, but it’s beautiful, and is important, The Doctor. And in Italy, The Doctor is a name you give to someone for respect, it’s very important, The Doctor… important”. Although Valentino often jokes that the name arrived because in Italy, Rossi is a very common surname for Doctors.

Watch The Doctor ride….

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Why is iPhone perfect for doctors

I purchased my iPhone about six months ago and it has in many ways changed my life for the better. This is especially true regarding my work as a medical doctor. I believe that iPhone is a perfect gadget and that it can improve any physician’s performance. That is way I decided to present some of many useful ways you can utilize iPhone in your practice.

Access your Electronic Medical Record

Life Record is a company which produces Life Record Electronic Medical Record (EMR) software. What is interesting about it is that you can access your records form an iPhone. You can also make updates and even write prescriptions.

View medical images

To view your radiology images remotely you can use the Mobile MIM iPhone Application. This application provides multi-planar reconstruction of data sets from modalities including CT, PET, MRI and SPECT, as well as multi-modality image fusion. Using the multi-touch interface, users can change image sets and planes; adjust zoom, fusion blending, and window/level.

Calculate, compute, add, subtract, multiply, divide

Medical Calculator gives quick access to calculations that are too hard to memorize or perform in your head. There are around 50 clinical calculations that you can do with it right now, and more are coming. To not get lost, favorite those you use often.

Medical calculator

Access drug information

Epocrates Rx software for iPhone puts continually updated peer-reviewed drug information at your fingertips. This can improve patient care and safety, save time, reduce administrative burden and enable confident clinical decisions.

Take notes

There are many powerful note taking apps for iPhone out there. But let me just present the two most interesting, Evernote and Jott.

Evernote allows you to take text, snapshot, saved photo and voice notes. When you take for example a voice note, you can add a title to it, some description and tags. The interesting thing happens after you have taken your notes. They synchronize with your online account and what this means is that you can access them from anywhere. From your computer using a desktop application or from any other computer in the World with an Internet connection via the web interface. Everything is always synchronized across all of your devices. One cool thing that Evernote can do is transcribe images, meaning that it is capable to find text inside an image and make it searchable. It doesn’t yet transcribe your voice notes to text, but I believe this feature will be coming in the near future.

There are some advices on how to use Evernote on The Efficient MD blog, but I am sure you can think of many more ways to utilize this app. For example you could take snapshots of your patient’s injuries in the ER or record interviews with your patients.

Well, this other application, Jott is capable of doing what Evernote still can’t. It can capture your to-dos and transcribe your voice into text and place the resulting notes in your lists.

If you like Evernote, but desperately need for your voice notes to be transcribed to text, don’t worry. There is this great hack from Lifehacker that can help you.

Stay on top of your field

As a modern evidence based medicine physician you have to read and follow new developments in your field. Often you find interesting articles on the Internet, but don’t have time to read them. My advice is to save them for latter and read them on your iPhone during your breaks, when you are on call and have some free time or while waiting in some line. Perfect little app that can help you do just that is Instapaper and it is one of my favorite iPhone app ever. When you find something on your computer that you want to read later, simply click Read latter bookmark. Then when you have time, just open Instapaper app on your iPhone and read those articles. You would think that the iPhone’s screen is too small to read, but you would be wrong. It’s high resolution screen and zoom capabilities make reading enjoyable.

Of course you can read whole books on the iPhone too. Use Stanza to transfer and read all your important medical e-books.

Apart from reading, you can do a little bit of watching and listening, to thousands of podcasts in the medicine category. A podcast is a series of audio or video digital-media files which is distributed over the Internet and can be transfered to your iPhone. Listen and watch podcast from The Lancet, The New England Journal of Medicine and many others while you, let say, travel to work.
Podcast directory

Enhance your scientific research

You can use your iPhone to find scientific literature. Download PubSearch and search among the millions of research papers indexed in PubMed. This app has a simple user interface with fast access to the PubMed database, and it lets you concentrate on finding the research articles you need without getting in your way. PubSearch Plus is on the way and it will allow you to not only read abstracts, but full-text articles too.

Convert your iPhone into a wireless external disk, one with a lot of memory. This way you can carry around all the important documents for your undergoing scientific project. Come to a meeting with your colleagues and have all your excel and powerpoint files with you. Also bring some scientific articles in pdf, or other format, related to your research. All these files can easily be opened on your iPhone or access from any PC or Mac in the room. This is all done using AirSharing for iPhone.

Play games

You too deserve to have fun from time to time. There are numerous great games for iPhone and if nothing these can help you relax during an intensive and difficult shift. There have been some results published about video games and their ability to enhance surgeons’ performance. So before your next surgery why not try playing a game like Labyrinth to get you all warmed up and focused.

As you can see there are numerous useful ways you can utilize iPhone as a medical professional. This is not all of course, there are many other interesting apps coming up everyday and I did not mention the obvious things like reading email, surfing the web and contacting people via sms or IM services. I am looking forward to new medical apps that might appear in the future. Also, wouldn’t it be cool if somebody introduced some iPhone medical accessories. I would like to see some pulse oximeter sensors or ECG cables for iPhone. They could plugin-in to it’s 30-pin dock connector to input data which, I am sure, due to it’s processing power iPhone would not have a problem to analyze. Are we getting closer to those great all in one medical devices from Star Trek? 🙂
Star Trek

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To Blog or Practice Medicine

I been working 48 hours shifts in the Emergency Department this whole month and I am starting to feel just a little bit tired. I completely neglected my blog cause I just could not find the time and energy to post new stories.

Well it seams Dr. Arnold Kim has resolved his dilemma regarding medicine and blogging. This month he stopped practicing medicine and started blogging full time on his highly popular technology blog called MacRumors.

Read his story in The New York Times – My Son, the Blogger: An M.D. Trades Medicine for Apple Rumors

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HOPKINS

On June 26th, ABC News started airing its six-part series called “Hopkins” which takes an intimate look at the men and women who work at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Each episode follows a few characters, both healthcare workers and patients, and their stories. The series is greatly produced and is very inspiring to watch. So far, two episodes came out and here are their summaries:

Episode 1

Twenty-one years ago Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinjosa climbed a 20-foot border fence so he could join other illegal immigrants picking fruit in the lush valleys of central California. Today he is one of the nation’s elite brain surgeons. He tells ABC News about his remarkable journey as viewers watch him try to save a man’s life.

Karen Boyle is among the new generation of surgeons. She is the first female attending in urology at Hopkins, and determined to maintain a balance between her family and her job. But what sets her apart from other surgeons is the candid counseling about sexual health and intimacy she offers to her patients.

Brian Bethea has made it to the top of one of the most difficult residencies in medicine, cardiothoracic surgery. After nine years of apprenticeship he is ready to join the ranks of the nation’s most illustrious heart and lung surgeons. But the demands of residency have left his family life in shambles. Repairing a ruptured aorta may be easier than saving his marriage.

Episode 2

Brenda Thompson is dying from an obscure and always fatal lung disease. After two failed marriages, her third husband seems to be the man of her dreams. But time is running out. Only a lung transplant can save her. And a new lung may not become available in time. When a donor does become available in New England, there is jubilation. But events take an ominous turn when the donor lungs turn out to be damaged.

Brian Bethea, the promising cardiothoracic surgeon with marital problems, has been sent to harvest the new lungs that turn out to be damaged. Nothing seems to be going right for him. When Brian returns home, he must explain to his daughters that he and their mother are separating and he has found his own apartment.

Mustapha Saheed is in his third year of emergency medicine. At six foot, seven inches tall, this self-described “big black man” cuts a striking figure as he dashes through the ER. Despite the advice of a colleague to not marry the “girlfriend who got you through residency,” Saheed makes plans for the altar.

You can watch Hopkins on ABC News website

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