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My iPad app: AED Trainer

This post was originally published on Tue, 02/28/2012. However, due to issues with web hosting it has been temporarily removed.

A new iOS app I have been working on with my partners for quite some time, has finally been released today in the iTunes store. This iPad specific app is called AED Trainer and can be purchased on sale for 5.99 USD for a limited time period.

AED Trainer app transforms the iPad into a life-like simulator of automatic external defibrillator (AED), allowing the users to get familiar with these life-saving devices. For those who don’t know, AEDs are electronic devices used to deliver electrical shocks to people suffering from cardiac arrest. Electrical shock, also called defibrillation, represents the only therapy for dangerous heart rhythms such as ventricular fibrillation. It is important to note that these devices are not intended to be used by healthcare professionals only. Quite the contrary, they are predominantly aimed at lay rescuers, so you might have seen them hanging on the walls of airports, train stations, stadiums, and other public places. Everyone should know how to use these devices, because cardiac arrest can happen anywhere, anytime and to anyone, and you might just be the one who can save a life. With the AED Trainer app you can experience how a live AED works, try out different scenarios, and be ready to use an actual device in case of a real emergency.

You can learn more about AEDs by watching our “How to use an AED” video.

Download AED Trainer app from the iTunes store.

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My company: Ivor Medical

Ivor Medical website
Dear visitors and friends, I give you Ivor Medical 🙂
Ivor Medical is a company which I have started in order to develop my invention for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Some of you will remember my talk from Mobile Monday Amsterdam event earlier this year, where for the first time I have presented my invention which is intended to relieve rescuers’ fatigue, as well as provide feedback during CPR. After being awarded with several prestigious awards from international innovation fairs, I have decided to seriously pursue the development of my invention into a product available for market. So far, my company has developed a mobile application for CPR feedback called CPR PRO, which is already available in the iTunes store, and will soon also be available for Android phones. My cradle for holding a mobile phone during CPR is also in its final stage of development, and I expect it to be available for sale by the end of this year.

Go ahead and visit Ivor Medical website to learn more. It goes without saying that your suggestions are always welcomed.

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G for Geneva, G for Gold


I just came back home from 38th Exhibition of Inventions Geneva held in Geneva, Switzerland. Among around a thousand inventions, including 55 from class M (Medicine, Surgery, Hygiene, Orthopedics, Materials for the handicapped), I have demonstrated my CPR device (you can see it in my presentation from Amsterdam). The whole experience was truly fantastic and made even sweeter at the end, since my invention was awarded a gold medal from the international jury. Big thank you goes out to people from Noven, StivTrade, Croatian Association of Inventors, and Istrian Inventors.

For a quick preview, take a look at the short video below. More media will follow.

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Informed Pocket Guides for the iPhone

Informed Pocket Guide
I discovered Informed Pocket Guides almost two years ago and have been a huge fan ever since. The first product I got was the Emergency & Critical Care Pocket Guide. I believe the fact that I take extra care this little/big guide is always in my bag when I go to work, says it all. It is small, light and compact, yet it has all the necessary reference information you might need in medical emergencies. It is especially useful if you work in the field.
Informed Pocket Guide pages
Emergency & Critical Care Pocket Guide has almost 200 pages and covers the following topics:

  • Current ACLS Algorithms, Lab Values, Metrics, Notes
  • Emergency, ACLS Drugs & Top Prescription Drugs
  • IV Drips, Drug Infusions, Dosages
  • Poisons & Overdose / ‘Rave’ Drug
  • 12-Lead ECG Section & Acute MI
  • Medical Emergencies Section
  • Quick EMS Spanish Translations
  • Fibrinolytics for AMI & Stroke / CVA
  • Childbirth, Diabetic, Respiratory Distress
  • Pediatric Resuscitation, Drug Doses, Vitals
  • Trauma, Triage, MCI, Glasgow Coma Scales
  • Airway Management /RSI
  • Burn Charts, the ‘Rule of 9s’
  • Pulse Oximetry
  • Infectious Diseases

Well, ever since the first iPhone medical apps started appearing, I thought to myself… hmmm I would love to have my medical pocket guides on this great device. Obviously, it was just a matter of time when Informed would port them to this mobile platform, and yes they are here! The complete series of Informed Medical Pocket Guides are now available for the iPhone and iPod touch. Titles like the RN Pocket Guide™, EMS Field Guide® BLS & ALS edition, NIMS: Incident Command System Field Guide™, and of course the Emergency & Critical Care Pocket Guide™ are available for $9,99 USD via the iTunes store. In fact the Emergency & Critical Care Pocket Guide app has just recently been updated with many improvements, so now is the best time to present it to you.

Informed Pocket Guide and app
If we take a look at the content, the app is the same as the pocket guide. The basic difference is that on one side you have a physical pocket guide, and on the other an application for your iPhone. Now, bringing the guide to the iPhone has some advantages and some disadvantages. First of all, you no longer have to worry about forgetting the pocket guide. You have all the same information available on your mobile phone, which you carry everyday and everywhere you go. This all makes perfect sense, since the iPhone is by itself a great mobile phone for doctors and other medical workers. So having another great medical app running on it just makes it even more powerful. Furthermore, you can do things with the app which are impossible or difficult to do with the pocket guide. One such thing, and maybe the most important one, is finding information quickly. The pocket guide is not an encyclopedia, but still it has a lot of dense information on small pages, so finding exactly what you need can prove to be difficult. Sometimes I just know that I have seen a piece of information or a chart in the guide, but cannot find it unless I flip thru numerous pages. The app is the champion in this area. It is very easy to find information you need thanks to the great built in search function, but also other navigation features like the possibility to flick thru pages, go to a specific page, browse the table of contents and see thumbnails of pages. Other interesting features include bookmarks and notes which again are there to make the data you need and often use more accessible. On the down side, the iPhone screen is a little bit smaller that the pages of the pocket guide. Maybe this could be a problem for some, even though the resolution is high so you can simply zoom in and see all the details. Also, you might not like the idea of bringing your iPhone with you in the field out of the fear it might get damaged or other reasons. I also found that sometimes its touch screen does not work flawlessly if I wear protective gloves.

Here are some of the photos of the Emergency & Critical Care app and the pocket guide:

Both the pocket guide and the app have things going for them, so you will have to choose which one better suites your work flow and style. I like them both so much and cannot decide. It seams that the pocket guide will remain in my bag and the app on my iPhone. I am really looking forward to new updates of the app, and hope that in the future it will incorporate more interactive content, so it could maybe replace some of the other apps I have installed on my iPhone, like various medical calculators.

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AirStrip CRITICAL CARE

The Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) is taking place in San Francisco right now. On the first day Apple introduced the new iPhone 3G S. They also continued their tradition of presenting some interesting upcoming applications.

AirStrip Technologies has presented its new medical app called Critical Care. I really don’t have any comments at this moment other than WATCH THE VIDEO IT WILL BLOW YOUR MIND!

AirStrip CRITICAL CARE features include:

  • Virtual Views – Remote, virtual real-time monitoring of live cardiac rhythm strips and other waveform data such as pulse oximetry, end tidal CO2 and peak ventilator pressures.
  • Strip Zooming – The zoom feature maintains relative size of waveforms and the background grid allows for easy assessment and measurements.
  • Automated Caliper – The automated caliper measures designated intervals, both automatically and manually.
  • Strip Scrolling – The scroll function allows users to quickly scroll through stored waveform data, such as telemetry strips.
  • Patient Data Display – Tidal volume, airway pressure, flow and volume readings are also available in virtual real-time, directly from patient monitors.

AirStrip already has one interesting application available in iTunes store called AirStrip OB. This application, intended for obstetricians, delivers vital patient waveform data — including fetal heartbeat and maternal contraction patterns — in virtual real-time directly from the hospital labor and delivery unit to a doctor’s iPhone.

If you are interested you can watch the whole Apple WWDC 2009 Keynote Address.

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Swine flu outbreak in iTunes store

There seam to be more swine flu apps in iTunes store than confirmed swine flu cases throughout the World :). As of today, there are 25 iPhone applications related to swine influenza available in iTunes store.

Swine Flu iTunes

Eleven of these apps are free, while the other 14 cost somewhere between $0.99 and $1.99. Most of these apps are either trackers, meaning that they show you maps of swine flu cases, or RSS aggregators, bringing you the latest swine influenza news. I tried all of the free apps, and can tell you that none of them really impressed me. Some are better designed than others, some offer more functions, but none are great. For example, Swine Flu Tracker Map looks great, but its map loads so painfully slow that you want to shoot yourself. On the other hand, The Swine Flu Tracker (notice how creative the names of these apps are) doesn’t offer any additional features, but has the fastest loading map. As for news aggregators, my favorite would have to be H1N1 (Swine Flu) Update.

Please excuse me now, I am very busy developing my own swine flu app, which I am going to call TA DA !!! Swine Flu, I’m Tracking U.

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