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HOPKINS

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On June 26th, ABC News started airing its six-part series called “Hopkins” which takes an intimate look at the men and women who work at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Each episode follows a few characters, both healthcare workers and patients, and their stories. The series is greatly produced and is very inspiring to watch. So far, two episodes came out and here are their summaries:

Episode 1

Twenty-one years ago Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinjosa climbed a 20-foot border fence so he could join other illegal immigrants picking fruit in the lush valleys of central California. Today he is one of the nation’s elite brain surgeons. He tells ABC News about his remarkable journey as viewers watch him try to save a man’s life.

Karen Boyle is among the new generation of surgeons. She is the first female attending in urology at Hopkins, and determined to maintain a balance between her family and her job. But what sets her apart from other surgeons is the candid counseling about sexual health and intimacy she offers to her patients.

Brian Bethea has made it to the top of one of the most difficult residencies in medicine, cardiothoracic surgery. After nine years of apprenticeship he is ready to join the ranks of the nation’s most illustrious heart and lung surgeons. But the demands of residency have left his family life in shambles. Repairing a ruptured aorta may be easier than saving his marriage.

Episode 2

Brenda Thompson is dying from an obscure and always fatal lung disease. After two failed marriages, her third husband seems to be the man of her dreams. But time is running out. Only a lung transplant can save her. And a new lung may not become available in time. When a donor does become available in New England, there is jubilation. But events take an ominous turn when the donor lungs turn out to be damaged.

Brian Bethea, the promising cardiothoracic surgeon with marital problems, has been sent to harvest the new lungs that turn out to be damaged. Nothing seems to be going right for him. When Brian returns home, he must explain to his daughters that he and their mother are separating and he has found his own apartment.

Mustapha Saheed is in his third year of emergency medicine. At six foot, seven inches tall, this self-described “big black man” cuts a striking figure as he dashes through the ER. Despite the advice of a colleague to not marry the “girlfriend who got you through residency,” Saheed makes plans for the altar.

You can watch Hopkins on ABC News website

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Emergency physician, blogger (ivor-kovic.com), innovator (ivormedical.com), researcher (researchgate.net/profile/Ivor_Kovic), speaker (youtu.be/Q-E-B3Pc8mk)...

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