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Intraosseous access video lecture

Intraosseous access is now a common procedure in emergency departments. Everyone seams to be familiar with how to use some of the popular assisted devices. It is very easy to learn how to use them during a quick workshop. However, I have noticed that many do not know all the theory around it. They are good at the sexy bit of introducing the needle, but do not really understand indications, contraindications and all the other parts, like anaesthesia, to make the most of it.
Enjoy.

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Emergency Physicians on Twitter

twitter researcher
One of my side projects is to maintain the most comprehensive list of Emergency Physicians using Twitter @research_er. Just this weekend I took some time to brush the dust off this project that I host at TwittER ResearchER website. I double checked all the users already on the list and added some new ones. So now I am following 1232 Emergency Physicians across the globe that use Twitter!

The cool thing is that you don’t have to be an active user of Twitter yourself to tap into this exciting and fresh stream of consciousness of the best Emergency Medicine experts in the World. You can simply visit TwittER ResearchER website for a constant and real time source of useful advice, heated discussions, cutting edge research and novel ideas.

I highly recommend it first thing in the morning! You’ll see, your tea will be sweater and your coffee more creamy.

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CPR PRO® Device Reduces Rescuer Fatigue during CPR

CPR PRO
We have just published an article in The Journal of Emergency Medicine titled “CPR PRO® Device Reduces Rescuer Fatigue during Continuous Chest Compression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Crossover Trial Using a Manikin Model”

This is the first trial to test the benefits of the device I have invented and have been developing the last couple of years. This device is called CPR PRO and is intended to allow rescuers to performed better chest compressions.

Here is the summary of the article:

1. Why is this topic important?
Rescuers are often required to perform cardiopulmo- nary resuscitation (CPR) for prolonged periods of time, and their fatigue has been shown to cause significant decline in quality of chest compressions, which are crucial for survival of sudden cardiac arrest victims.

2. What does this study attempt to show?
In our randomized crossover trial, health care professionals performed continuous chest compression CPR for 10 min on a manikin to evaluate the impact of a novel CPR PRO! device for manual chest compression on res- cuer fatigue, pain, and CPR quality.

3. What are the key findings?
After using the CPR PRO device, subjects reported less pain in the hands and lower perceived exertion levels, as well as achieving lower average and maximal heart rates during testing, when compared to standard manual CPR. Reduced fatigue and pain has resulted in higher average depth of chest compressions, which declined more slowly over time, than with standard manual CPR.

4. How is patient care impacted?
In a simulated setting, a novel CPR PRO device for manual chest compression has been shown to reduce the work of CPR, which allowed rescuers to achieve signifi- cantly higher quality of chest compressions. Delivering higher quality of chest compressions with minimal interruptions in the clinical setting has a potential to result in better patient outcomes after sudden cardiac arrest.

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Resuscitation 2012


Tomorrow I will be travelling to Vienna, Austria to take part in the Resuscitation 2012 congress organised by the European Resuscitation Council. At this annual congress, which will take place from Thursday 18 October until Saturday 20 October 2012, I will be one of the members of the official Social Media Team. Our team will work HARD&FAST to bring you all the news and updates live during the Resuscitation 2012 congress.

Follow us across all our networks:
Blog
Facebook
Twitter –  use #erc12vienna hashtag to be heard!
Vimeo
Flickr

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Podcast: Bringing CPR into schools

A week ago, Resuscitation Council UK, together with the British Heart Foundation and the famous football player Fabrice Muamba, presented a 100,000-signature petition to Downing Street in order to make CPR mandatory part of school curriculum in the United Kingdom.

European Resuscitation Council spoke with Dr. Andrew Lockey, representative of Resuscitation Council, about their efforts to increase survival rates of sudden cardiac arrest in the UK by educating thousands of school children.

To find out how you can help, visit the BHF website.
Read one of my older posts, to learn what happened to Fabrice Muamba.

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