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RCEM15 conference

I just came back from The Royal College of Emergency Medicine Annual Scientific Conference held in Manchester, UK from 28 to 30 September. It was an excellent conference, with great organisation and fantastic speakers including international lecturers like the larger than life Scott Weingart and amazing Cliff Reid, not to mention a range of UK based professors and consultants.

For a brilliant summary of the most exciting lectures, I recommend you visit the RCEM FOAMed Network.

I have participated with two abstracts based on the research I have conducted during the last 6 months. Both were presented as posters, and you can view them below.

Patient Results Collector, an open source computer software to facilitate clinical audits. A case study.

Can we consider adjusting cutoff point of HemosIL D-dimer assay fo the exclusion of pulmonary embolism?

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Emergency Physicians on Twitter

twitter researcher
One of my side projects is to maintain the most comprehensive list of Emergency Physicians using Twitter @research_er. Just this weekend I took some time to brush the dust off this project that I host at TwittER ResearchER website. I double checked all the users already on the list and added some new ones. So now I am following 1232 Emergency Physicians across the globe that use Twitter!

The cool thing is that you don’t have to be an active user of Twitter yourself to tap into this exciting and fresh stream of consciousness of the best Emergency Medicine experts in the World. You can simply visit TwittER ResearchER website for a constant and real time source of useful advice, heated discussions, cutting edge research and novel ideas.

I highly recommend it first thing in the morning! You’ll see, your tea will be sweater and your coffee more creamy.

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CPR PRO® Device Reduces Rescuer Fatigue during CPR

CPR PRO
We have just published an article in The Journal of Emergency Medicine titled “CPR PRO® Device Reduces Rescuer Fatigue during Continuous Chest Compression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Crossover Trial Using a Manikin Model”

This is the first trial to test the benefits of the device I have invented and have been developing the last couple of years. This device is called CPR PRO and is intended to allow rescuers to performed better chest compressions.

Here is the summary of the article:

1. Why is this topic important?
Rescuers are often required to perform cardiopulmo- nary resuscitation (CPR) for prolonged periods of time, and their fatigue has been shown to cause significant decline in quality of chest compressions, which are crucial for survival of sudden cardiac arrest victims.

2. What does this study attempt to show?
In our randomized crossover trial, health care professionals performed continuous chest compression CPR for 10 min on a manikin to evaluate the impact of a novel CPR PRO! device for manual chest compression on res- cuer fatigue, pain, and CPR quality.

3. What are the key findings?
After using the CPR PRO device, subjects reported less pain in the hands and lower perceived exertion levels, as well as achieving lower average and maximal heart rates during testing, when compared to standard manual CPR. Reduced fatigue and pain has resulted in higher average depth of chest compressions, which declined more slowly over time, than with standard manual CPR.

4. How is patient care impacted?
In a simulated setting, a novel CPR PRO device for manual chest compression has been shown to reduce the work of CPR, which allowed rescuers to achieve signifi- cantly higher quality of chest compressions. Delivering higher quality of chest compressions with minimal interruptions in the clinical setting has a potential to result in better patient outcomes after sudden cardiac arrest.

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My iPad app: AED Trainer

This post was originally published on Tue, 02/28/2012. However, due to issues with web hosting it has been temporarily removed.

A new iOS app I have been working on with my partners for quite some time, has finally been released today in the iTunes store. This iPad specific app is called AED Trainer and can be purchased on sale for 5.99 USD for a limited time period.

AED Trainer app transforms the iPad into a life-like simulator of automatic external defibrillator (AED), allowing the users to get familiar with these life-saving devices. For those who don’t know, AEDs are electronic devices used to deliver electrical shocks to people suffering from cardiac arrest. Electrical shock, also called defibrillation, represents the only therapy for dangerous heart rhythms such as ventricular fibrillation. It is important to note that these devices are not intended to be used by healthcare professionals only. Quite the contrary, they are predominantly aimed at lay rescuers, so you might have seen them hanging on the walls of airports, train stations, stadiums, and other public places. Everyone should know how to use these devices, because cardiac arrest can happen anywhere, anytime and to anyone, and you might just be the one who can save a life. With the AED Trainer app you can experience how a live AED works, try out different scenarios, and be ready to use an actual device in case of a real emergency.

You can learn more about AEDs by watching our “How to use an AED” video.

Download AED Trainer app from the iTunes store.

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Directory of Emergency Physicians on Twitter

twitter researcher
I just launched a new mini website called TwittER ReaserchER. It is essentially a directory of emergency physicians across the globe who are using Twitter. The project started during research for an article about use of Twitter among emergency physicians. I started tweeting in 2008, and at that time there were only but a few emergency docs out there, but now we managed to identify almost 700 of them. The results of the analysis we performed on their accounts are currently under review in Emergency Medicine Journal. Hopefully the article will be accepted and published soon, so I can share the results with you.

On the website you can find a list of all the emergency physicians we were able to find using Twitter. Each user is represented by his/hers profile picture. If you click on it, you will be taken to the user’s Twitter profile. The list is constantly updating, and if you are an emergency physician using Twitter or know someone who is, please follow @research_er to get included. On this account we also created lists organizing emergency physicians according to the year they started tweeting. You can easily subscribe to these lists.

On the site you can also see the timeline of tweets from all the emergency physicians. It is updating every hour, so you can use it to follow what emergency physicians are saying on Twitter. This way you can follow them, without even being a registered Twitter user, which you should be!

Hope you like the site. I will try to improve it and add more features soon. Of course, your ideas are always welcomed.

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